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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

After 16yrs my BB is running fine, but I keep reading of FPR issues on some models. So I thought I'd order a new FPR for my 05FI BB and the little alloy fitting with the two new O rings that it mounts onto.

Mine has been, and still is working fine after all this time and 129k kms. :unsure:..... well there is no petrol smell in the sump when I do the highly technical sniff test - maybe a workshop can pressure test the system to check if pump/injectors/FPR are all good). Anyway I figured I'd shout BB a new FPR........

Regulator Assy (=FPR) $135.00
Joint Set $39.00

Stock in Melbourne........ coming via covid express :LOL:
 

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I'm one for preventative maintenance, I replaced the FPR on Daily Bird some years ago (2013) simply because the original was 14 years old and had covered 81,034 miles.
Did the FPR need changing, probably not but knowing what trouble I would be in if it failed (bike used daily) it just seemed sensible.

Took the same approach with the cam chain and clutch (at just under 100K miles) the chain showed only the smallest amount of stretch and only the springs were out of spec in the clutch. I had my money out of the original parts, so I didn't hesitate to spend on replacements. Motor good for more miles ....... when we are allowed to ride again.
 

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when we are allowed to ride again
To be on topic, I plan to do preventative measures and replace couple of things, including FPR and clutch for the heck of it, but what do you mean you're not allowed to ride? I know you have lockdown but how does it apply to riding bikes, can't you go around town for groceries or something, on a bike?
 

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Technically we can indeed still ride for groceries, but seeing as Britain seems to be having one of the colder winters for a few years, even if we weren't in lockdown it wouldn't be fun. Currently snowing and there's been plenty of salt on the roads too.
 

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Preventative maintenance is always a good idea. Fuel types will have a large effect in the diaphragm inside. Stateside we have tis little gremlin known as ethanol. They are allowed up to 10%. Thing is it's hell on rubber parts. Now if I lived one county over I'd be clear of it. So if your fortunate enough to not have this your going to have a lot longer FPR life.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys, I was starting to think I had just spent $174 needlessly, since I have real petroleum (not Effing-nol), but a 16yr run is pretty good, and the mechanic that will install the new FPR and adapter works for free (me :D).......... I can consider it part of my recent fluids,plugs and tank rust overhaul..... and keep riding with 100% confidence (y)
 

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Stateside we have tis little gremlin known as ethanol.
So do we here, currently 5% but going up to 10%.
I now hate the stuff with a vengeance. On my last ride before the last lock down (we are at 3 now) Dr Big ground to a halt. Deep in one of the tanks where you can't see there must have been some kind of liner. The ethanol broke it down into minute 'rubbery particles' which blocked the fuel filter. Had to clean out the tank and carbs (lots of chemicals to get the tank back to bare metal) and then add a new ethanol proof liner.
 

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Wait wait, what's this ethanol thing, additive they put in every type of fuel, regardless of gas stations? Do they have declarations on how much of it they throw in the mix? And how does it affect the engine? I only know ethanol from garage stories back in the day, the drag race cars would usually run ethanol instead of fuel at some point, I think to prevent knock or something, as they didn't have means to control ignition timing when doing those budget builds.
 

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Tom check the pump. Here they will state on the pump may contain up to 10% ethanol. They can't put anymore than that in it stateside. The auto manufacturer's know that the systems don't tolerate it well. The older vehicles even less. Then there is the second Evil we with here in larger cities is oxygenation. Where they chemically add oxygen in the mix.
 

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I can't remember the fuel pumps in Croatia but most of Europe shows E5 for 5% ethanol and E10 for 10%. I always go for the lowest ethanol content I can find when I'm touring.
 

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So what's the purpose of it? Dilute the liter of fuel, use 0.5L fuel 0.5L chemical shampoo or do they claim it does something else? I'll look into it at the service, rubber in fuel lines gets most affected correct?
 

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It's done here to help the farming communities as it's made from corn. No real benefit. If you could run straight ethanol then you'd make more power. But you'll have to run almost double the volume. It'll also support a much higher compression ratio as it has a self quenching effect.
And yes mainly rubber components are it's main issue. Viton rubber us more resistant. But as long as your not above 10% your pretty safe. It'll only become an issue over time.
One other thing to be mindful of. Don't store a vehicle with this unless the tank is fully topped off. The ethanol is hydroscopic so it will leach moisture out of the air around it. So if your tank is 1/2 full you risk causing flash rusting inside the tank where bare metal is exposed for a length of time.
 
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Wait wait, what's this ethanol thing, additive they put in every type of fuel, regardless of gas stations? Do they have declarations on how much of it they throw in the mix? And how does it affect the engine? I only know ethanol from garage stories back in the day, the drag race cars would usually run ethanol instead of fuel at some point, I think to prevent knock or something, as they didn't have means to control ignition timing when doing those budget builds.

Cheers Tom,

Drag and Speedway riders have been using 'METHanol' fuel for ages ....... it is not the same as the 'ETHanol' blend found at fuel pumps. As others have commented, many countries have legislated 5 or 10% target for "ethanol" fuel for perceived environmental benefits....... errrrrr, income support to farmers so they can grow crops for cash instead of for food for their people's... :rolleyes:.

Brazil has been 'growing' their methanol fuel supplies for decades, so they are not so dependent on oil companies, but their auto's have been seriously modified to run on it (and won't/can't run on normal gasoline), just like our Drag & Speedway bikes.

Ethanol is supposed to lower the cost of fuel and reduce emissions, but it also increases fuel consumption and affects rubbery parts and filters, especially in older vehicles not designed for it, but also it warps plastic fuel tanks and still jams fuel sender floats and affects pumps in late model vehicles supposedly able to cope with it's harsh chemistry. there is no performance increase (unless octane additives are used ethanol is essentially just a filler, a cheat, a dilution agent, just like an SAS air pump adds fresh air to spent exhaust emissions to pass exhaust gas analyser tests ;)).

Luckily Aus still has plenty of normal ULP and PULP - but more and more fuel stations are providing E10 and some even have E85 for the few cars that have been specially designed to run on 85% corn juice........ so our days are numbered........ :eek:.......... I see Hyundai has a Hydrogen-electric model coming soon - maybe that will be my car driving option, sadly the bikes will suffer endless failures of fuel pumps and filters and corrosion etc etc :unsure:

(y)
 

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Thanks for the reply Dave! Seems I got those two confused, I think some tuned cars around here were done or tuned to use E85 in race mode, but only certain percentage mix with regular fuel. I'll check around the gas station next time I go if there are any declarations regarding ethanol.

As far as Australia and methanol, I remember a certain V8 from down under, ran on methane, the ducks guts! :D
 

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There's a couple of insane bikes here that run E85 and turbo'd. Rhe catcher was they had to actually go to race E85. The stations here that said it was 85 were actually only at 65%. Which his combo hated. He is actually running a static 14:1 compression ratio with 20#'s of boost on a R1. He runs flying mile competitions in the 200 mph zone.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Tom, that V8 running on methane........

:ROFLMAO: a mad max interceptor with a methane generator full of pigshite?......

Ahhhh methane :( the 70's answer to rising fuel costs... and the smell of rotten egg gas :LOL:.....but that's what cows pfart, or more correctly, burp out :LOL: - did you know methane is produced by the bacteria in their gut, and If cattle are fed on a certain type of seaweed, their burp's become greenhouse gas friendly as the gut develops new bacteria which don't produce methane.

Methane is being released in huge amounts as the once frozen solid Arctic Tundra's thaw out due increased warming (the video's of guys lighting fires after poking holes in the ground are amazing), and burping cows! o_O........ :eek:......

I won't mention collapsing glaciers killing dam construction workers...... of darn it, I just did :rolleyes:....... we are all :censored:'d.

By contrast methanol exhaust fumes used to sting and make our eyes water at the dyno when tuning up a new speedway car, and it was very dangerous in a fuel spill as it burns with a clear flame....... :eek:....... hence the odd videos of Indy car pit crews dancing strangely during a fuel stops gone wrong, seemingly for no reason, but they are actually on fire!

In it's pure form, methanol is not a great fuel for the general driving public...... and methane stinks. ;)
 

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Ah yes I remember that angle, in the 3rd Mad Max they go around pig farms for methane :D I don't think none of those things ever got introduced here, LPG is the most alternative fuel you can buy here, methanes and others, corn derivatives, I'm not aware if they're available anywhere en masse...but I'm sure it'll come, Greta will find the way :D
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Got my new FPR and "joint set" adapter today........ so it's time to pop the tank and spill some fuel......... :LOL:
 

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Hi all,

After 16yrs my BB is running fine, but I keep reading of FPR issues on some models. So I thought I'd order a new FPR for my 05FI BB and the little alloy fitting with the two new O rings that it mounts onto.

Mine has been, and still is working fine after all this time and 129k kms. :unsure:..... well there is no petrol smell in the sump when I do the highly technical sniff test - maybe a workshop can pressure test the system to check if pump/injectors/FPR are all good). Anyway I figured I'd shout BB a new FPR........

Regulator Assy (=FPR) $135.00
Joint Set $39.00

Stock in Melbourne........ coming via covid express :LOL:
Hi Dave
who did you get your FPR through?
all this talk is making me think to do the same.
kind regards
Sam
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Hi Dave
who did you get your FPR through?
all this talk is making me think to do the same.
kind regards
Sam

Cheers samz,

I only bought mine as a precaution....... the more I read, the more I think it probably wasn't necessary because we have a choice not to use ethanol blend fuels in Aus, unlike most UK and US and EU owners.

Anyway, I just bought mine from a Honda shoppe..... ex stock in melbourne, $134 for the "Regulator Assy" and $39 for the "Joint Set" it fits onto - I wouldn't have known about the joint set except I read a post on the forum...... and the parts girl didn't mention it when she was looking for the FP regulator....... but I figured since I was disturbing a 16yo FPR, maybe the o-rings might fall apart.........

I have yet to install it - my Bird has no issues like.... poor economy, backfire on startup, or poor performance or fuel smell in the sump, but I figured rather than buy a fuel pressure test gauge (to use only once), or pay for a workshop to test it, I'd buy a new FPR and install it myself.

I'm not sure if they are cheaper on line - I just went through my local Honda parts counter because the sheila is good looking :D.

(y) PS See if you can do better than me and post the results ;)
 
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