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There's somewhat faded feel on the brakes, but my style of riding, or braking, is that I use a lot of rear brake (visual inspection on the rear pad screams change)....but what baffles me is that the pads look like there's enough life left.

4000 km's at least, prehaps even 5 or 6000 km...shouldn't they be almost finished, even if you ride slow and easy?

Also I took that digital meter to check the disc thickness, both are 4.72....which is odd again, I mean those are 20 year old discs, almost 100,000 kms :D
My 98 is currently at ~150 000km's on the Odo (probably closer to 180k due to Speedohealer correction) and still on the original disc although it's getting close to needing to be changed :unsure:
Apart from when I first got it with ~32k before I got it she has had EBC HH pads on the front and rear, probably 4 sets on the front, not too sure how many sets for the rear (2?) as I've tended to change the fronts when down about 2/3 and chucked the pads in the rear as the fronts wear so much faster :rolleyes:
Saying that I changed from the original front wheel to a later model FI wheel with decent discs as I prefer the cleaner look of the grey rims and figured finding carbed discs would only get harder and harder to come by and will swap the rear to a later grey one when I next need a rear tyre so likely won't need new discs in a long time ;)

As for the Scottoiler Stormy mine is set up with the outlet nozzle underneath to drip on the chain going around the sprocket and I do find a bit of fling especially inside the rear rim when riding as speed ;)
 

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There's somewhat faded feel on the brakes, but my style of riding, or braking, is that I use a lot of rear brake (visual inspection on the rear pad screams change)....but what baffles me is that the pads look like there's enough life left.

4000 km's at least, prehaps even 5 or 6000 km...shouldn't they be almost finished, even if you ride slow and easy?

Also I took that digital meter to check the disc thickness, both are 4.72....which is odd again, I mean those are 20 year old discs, almost 100,000 kms :D
ok good question due to the he link brake system there are issues with it 10 20 years on. is your rear actually stopping hard enough? so if applying max rear braking force does the rear lock up? might be that the pmc/ master slave need a bit of rebuild just a thought ive delinked my rear its way better but... it will lock up if im not careful
 

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When I was bedding in the brakes, after 6-7 sessions of "from 60 to 5 km/h" braking actions, I went to try full stop on a rear brake out of that same worry you posted - and when pressing it proper, I head the subtle squeal from the rear and then I released the pedal, didn't want to flat spot my rubber :D but it does lock up, although it requires effort, in a sense I have to go for it, casually sitting in the seat and pressing on the pedal I don't think I'd be able to lock them up, have to put some weight on the pedal.
 

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because the brake pedal only works on the inner pistons in he rear caliper (2) the braking force is not great thats probably why your pads arent wearing out my rear brake is now set up to work on the outer pistons (4) on the rear pedal big difference is noticed
 

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New chain on today, I took the bike to the new shop this year, much happier with the service, and he told me there's a problematic amount of gunk on my front sprocket, possibly contributing to the premature chain wear. I guess the previous guy didn't touch this part when he replaced the chain last year. Oh well.
 

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New chain on today, I took the bike to the new shop this year, much happier with the service, and he told me there's a problematic amount of gunk on my front sprocket, possibly contributing to the premature chain wear. I guess the previous guy didn't touch this part when he replaced the chain last year. Oh well.
Hey, that output shaft looks dry! Did your mechanic put some molybdenum grease on it? It needs to be greased or you will get a red dust in there. Caused by the output shaft and the front sprocket grinding against each other.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Yep as guy has mentioned that's a classic sign of brinelling. You need to have him pack the splines with moly grease.
 

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In all fairness Fizzy. He may not have seen this before. I don't recall many other manufacturers making the dive sprocket a floater. Most of them are locked down when the bolt is tightened.
 

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I'll ask him about it, but it will be a nuance if it's not been done, it means the whole chain down again right?

Have to say, with trying to be as objective as possible, without the gunk and with new chain/sprockets, the bike shifts way smoother.
 

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Cheers Tom,

You can clean up your calipers and pistons (I use WD40 and wipe the grunge away). Also, clean and regrease, with HT brake grease, the two slider pins inside those rubber gaiter's, to make the calipers slide easily together. The system on my 05BB is a three piston dragger caliper, not the usual opposed piston style, so not as good as it could have been, but probably deliberately designed to prevent brake skidding without electronic intervention.

You are not getting much braking effort using mostly rear brake - there are plenty of video's on line to explain the physics as to why you should not depend on rear only braking - best to use mostly front brakes, with a bit of rear to add to the effect, especially with a passenger/load....... the linked brakes have been finely engineered to be used with mostly front braking, with some back up from rear lever.

In an emergency situation you may have trained yourself to go for the rear first, which will deny you 90% of your effective braking force...... eg as the front brakes decelerate the bike, weight transfers onto the front tyre, increasing the contact patch (lifting/reducing the rear tyre's grip) - so the rear brakes won't slow the bike much on their own. Using rear only takes much longer to stop.

Back in the early 60's some chopper riders were scared of using their front brakes, but this was due to the stupid design of their extended forks and skinny front wheels - the BB has a big fat 120 radial ply front tyre that can handle huge braking forces with ease. We don't all ride like MotoGP stars, but they only use their rears to control wheel spin!

Google some of those braking technique video's....... they just might save your life one day. I use them as a refresher course as they are great for revealing any bad habits that tend to creep in over the years.

(y)

PS You shouldn't have to remove the chain to check that sprocket...... just undo the sprocket bolt and if it has been greased you will see it...... if it's dry, loosen the rear adjusters and slacken the chain so you can slide the sprocket off the gearbox shaft and grease the splines......... I must check mine........ I can't recall if I greased mine when i put a new chain and sprocket on ......... :unsure: - take care to tighten the bolt back up properly though..... you don't want it to ever come loose!
 
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I'll ask him about it, but it will be a nuance if it's not been done, it means the whole chain down again right?

Have to say, with trying to be as objective as possible, without the gunk and with new chain/sprockets, the bike shifts way smoother.
Tom
As Dave states you can pack it yourself as Dave describes about a 30 minute job.
 
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Tom
As Dave states you can pack it yourself as Dave describes about a 30 minute job.
It's real handy to have an impact to get the bolt loose. If you don't some have put it in gear and put a 2x4 through the wheel across the swing arm to keep it from moving/rotating.

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new grips (can you believe 1st time doing this job?!) with heating elements beneath. had to redo the clutch side as the element kept sliding up the bar with the grip, hope i didn't destory it... it's gonna be hot here for several months, i'll wire up later. don't mind the gesture, it was hot and the job was kind of a pain :sneaky:
 

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It's real handy to have an impact to get the bolt loose. If you don't some have put it in gear and put a 2x4 through the wheel across the swing arm to keep it from rtating
From memory its the strongest torque on the bike.
 

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Stator and R/R done. Onboard voltmeter very happy all the time now.

Chased down a slight oil seep in the valve cover gasket that only made itself known after a high speed / high RPM track day. At first, I thought it was the CCT gasket, but after I pulled the bodywork, the oil pattern on the inside of the body panel seemed to indicate it was coming from higher up on the engine.

There was still an occasional "tapping" sound, and an accompanying tapping sensation in the clutch lever at idle. Once I'm done buttoning everything back up and doing an oil change, I'll see if it's still there.
 

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Fitted a spedohealer.
Changed the gearing earlier this summer and the speedo error was just to much so I went the easy way and spent some money on the speedohealer.
Feels really good to know exactly what your deviation from the speedlimit is :cool:
 

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Really like mine as well
 
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