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Hey all!

Been looking forward to getting my first ever bike. Somehow I may end up with a blackbird at a hell of a steal so I've been browsing these forums trying to educate myself (the wealth of knowledge sure does make it easy).

I know I probably should go with something a bit lower powered for my first bike but for the price I'm paying it's too hard to turn down. Im open to trade offers for something more reasonable.... Maybe.

Looking forward to getting to know you guys. If y'all have any resources I may have missed for a US '97 model feel free to hit me up. I'm sure there's gonna be things to fix but from what I can tell, it runs, it drives, and it needs some TLC.
 

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Its easy to ride,
Its also easy to lose it,
Its similar to a missile at full power, Thats not a joke either, 10.2 standing quarter, Stock,
Just take it very easy till you get to know it,
 

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It's all in the right hand.

Just make sure to get some experience of the bike before you twist that throttle too far.

Oh and remember, every other road user WILL try to kill you!

Welcome to the forum and stay safe (y)
 

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Roughly the 7 or so hours from the Oregon MSF equivalent
Ok, remember, you and you alone are in control of the right wrist.

For a couple of weeks riding, stay under 4000rpm and 1/4 throttle to get a feel for the bike.
Go to a deserted parking area and practice slow riding, start/stop, stalling and restarting etc.
Be very aware of road conditions directly ahead such as gravel/sand, shiny things in the road, tar snakes, painted lines etc.
Keep an eye on your tires. Condition, pressure very important for a bike.
Wear proper gear.
 

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Hi Rio,

All these folks have given great advice. My recommendation would have been simpler: Put the 'Bird in the back of your garage and pick up a cheap bike under 400cc and do all your learning on something cheap, light, easy to pick up, and not too heart-breaking to bend. I've been riding for 16 years now, and put 50,000km (30,000 miles) on a 250cc Kawasaki in my first 18 months riding. That one was dropped a couple of times--once at speed on gravel--and took me on a 3,500km (2,200 mile) round-trip around the East coast of Oz. I tried a Blackbird after that trip, and still found it way too big and powerful. I rode another 10 years on a 750cc Suzuki getting used to middle-weight size and power before stepping over a 'Bird again, and finding it a great fit. I started riding in my 40's, so I also spent up on full riding gear from top to toe, and it saved my life. I ride rain, hail or shine from freezing temps up to 47C (116F) in that gear and it can be made comfortable for any of those conditions.

Hope nobody minds different advice from an old man (who plans to get much older yet!).

Revenant
 

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One thing to note,

Keep it in a dead straight line when stopping,
It is top heavy, At 5 MPH it will throw you off the bike if its not dead in line,

Enjoy your Bird,
 

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Hi Rio,

No harm going to Bird first off so long as you are a calm kinda rider, in full control of your curiosity and prepared to build you knowledge gradually. It may be a good price/ buy but medical bills, life changing injuries or just writing it off within days far outway that temptation.

You've heard it already. If you buy it park it up and build your experience on a scratcher. Something cheap, battered (you will drop it… I guarantee you) and can be sold on afterwards. Assume you'll have three accidents and hope they're all minor (not all will be diwn to you).

Pointers for noobs:
1. Your mindset will either keep you safe or kill you… whether you're on a 125cc or a Bird.
2. Unless you are gym fit (strong core and upper body) the Bird is a big ask for a learner to handle. I say handle as opposed to ride as simply moving it while dismounted is a balance of skill/ technique v brute force. If she starts to fall, you're more likely to hurt yourself trying to save her or get her up again (assuming you aren't pinned under her). Never try to "lift her up". Technique is everything. "Roll her" back upright.
3. If you do buy only her… take the bodywork off… you'll save scratching, breaking it until you can handle her without putting her on her side (stationery or moving).
4. 100% of bike gear 100% of the time. The best helmet boots, gloves, leathers you can afford. It'll still be less than med bills. Even then, kit will only save losing your skin and flesh (plus keeping the body parts together). Usually it isn't the slide which kills you. It's what you hit or hits you. Forget riding like F1 where there's padding on all barriers, specialist asphalt/ tarmac, tyres and nothing oncoming.
5. Watch out for grit on the road in corners or when braking, you'll lose the front end and be off. Likewise man hole covers, leaves, diesel/ oil esp if minor moisture around, cardboard/ boards (risk of front wheel turning into a ski) , pooling water (hydroplaning), ice, changes in camber (esp crossing centre line on very adverse cambers), blind corners with your head over the centre line while leaning (you may headbutt oncoming traffic). Vehicles, animals and pedestrians who don't see you coming. Everything will try to kill or hurt you and/ or trash your bike. Practise braking somewhere safe. Braking too harshly can be just a troublesome as not braking effectively enough. Esp at speed you need to get used to stopping distances. Easy to go fast. Not so easy to slow down/ stop if not enough room ahead. The Birds linked brakes are "unusual". Applying front brake gives ⅔rds front brake ⅓rd rear… the usual balance to apply in normal conditions. Same true (but in reverse for the rear). So that removes some discretion to apply only front or only back compared to what you learnt on. Also, it means the Bird tends to "sit down" under braking with less "thrown forward" compared to other bikes. Delinking is possible via a kit. I haven't delinked but some have. Worth knowing if the bike you buy is OEM or delinked.
6. You are in control of the throttle. It's only a quarter turn from 0 to max. 1st gear goes from 0-70mph before it red lines (2.3seconds later) and you have 6 gears! You do the maths. You'll pop the front wheel or worse, flip her over if you twist too suddenly or dump the clutch (not just in 1st gear).
7. Check that you can get insured for a Bird. Here in the UK with only 7hrs riding experience you'd probably not even be able to get a quote else it would be stupidly expensive. So you may buy her but find you can't use her. Check the insurance situation before buying.
8. Never park with your nose downhill or side stand downhill. It's closer to rolling off the stand esp if given a minor knock or nudge, falling over or an extra problem to reverse. Pushing a Bird backwards uphill isn't the sensible choice if it can be avoided. Beware gravel drives!
9. Tyres: always best you can afford, keep in very good condition and keep at correct pressure (TPMS aftermarket systems are great these days). Poor tyres will have you off more easily and a Bird has immense performance so needs proper shoes (no cheapo retreads). Same is true for chains, sprockets and brake pads. Top quality, keep on top of maintenance.
10. Get yourself a trickle charger/ battery tender. The bikes electrics are one of it's known weaker points. Pushing her home is a major workout.

11. Pillions: best not take one for quite a while until you know the bike. However, if they aren't an experienced biker in their own right
a) never let them mount (or dismount) without you being ready and in full control of balancing the bike
b) don't let them mount/ dismount like with a horse (i.e NO to full weight on near side peg while throwing leg over. They tip you over. Stay on ground, slide leg over).
c) tell them to look over the shoulder matching the corner you are turning thru (right turn, right shoulder etc). This helps you turn. Worst case (esp if a hefty passenger) you end up understearing. Above 140mph you need them to warn you if changing shoulder looking over. Air is quite thick above 120mph and the change of airflow can whip your head suddenly sideways if not forewarned.
d) Unless they have arms like a gorilla tell them to hang onto you round your waist and sit tight close up. Nothing worse than hitting the anchors and having your pillion slam into your back, head butt your lid and suddenly transfer massive force thru your arms (rem they can always brace against the tank, keeping weight off your arms)!
e) Sit still. Tell them not to wriggle to get comfy while you are at slow speed (esp filtering between traffic). They may set up a sudden wobble and you could clip something in passing
f) 100% gear, 100% of the time for pillion too.

This is all doable without harm if you are prepared to be disciplined, cautious and take it in manageable stages. I've had my Bird 25yrs (dropped 3 times (most recently a few months back when I slipped on grit and a side wind caught the bike at the same time which pinned me against a wall… no damage to the bike but hurt like hell being pinned let alone struggling to right her), been off it 3 times (never at high speed… max I've been was 165mph but my pillion was upset so had to slow. Birds theoretically can do over 180mph). Latest crash (hit by a car pulling out without seeing me) was almost three years ago and I'm only now almost fully healed (and that was from an accident at 5-10 mph).

Whatever you decide to ride in the short term, ride defensively, assume everyone else hasn't seen you so be prepare to take evasive action. But overall have fun… Birds (whenever you get yours) are utterly fabulous! I grin like an idiot every time I ride mine!

Regards Mallow1
 

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Hi Rio,

No harm going to Bird first off so long as you are a calm kinda rider, in full control of your curiosity and prepared to build you knowledge gradually. It may be a good price/ buy but medical bills, life changing injuries or just writing it off within days far outway that temptation.

You've heard it already. If you buy it park it up and build your experience on a scratcher. Something cheap, battered (you will drop it… I guarantee you) and can be sold on afterwards. Assume you'll have three accidents and hope they're all minor (not all will be diwn to you).

Pointers for noobs:
1. Your mindset will either keep you safe or kill you… whether you're on a 125cc or a Bird.
2. Unless you are gym fit (strong core and upper body) the Bird is a big ask for a learner to handle. I say handle as opposed to ride as simply moving it while dismounted is a balance of skill/ technique v brute force. If she starts to fall, you're more likely to hurt yourself trying to save her or get her up again (assuming you aren't pinned under her). Never try to "lift her up". Technique is everything. "Roll her" back upright.
3. If you do buy only her… take the bodywork off… you'll save scratching, breaking it until you can handle her without putting her on her side (stationery or moving).
4. 100% of bike gear 100% of the time. The best helmet boots, gloves, leathers you can afford. It'll still be less than med bills. Even then, kit will only save losing your skin and flesh (plus keeping the body parts together). Usually it isn't the slide which kills you. It's what you hit or hits you. Forget riding like F1 where there's padding on all barriers, specialist asphalt/ tarmac, tyres and nothing oncoming.
5. Watch out for grit on the road in corners or when braking, you'll lose the front end and be off. Likewise man hole covers, leaves, diesel/ oil esp if minor moisture around, cardboard/ boards (risk of front wheel turning into a ski) , pooling water (hydroplaning), ice, changes in camber (esp crossing centre line on very adverse cambers), blind corners with your head over the centre line while leaning (you may headbutt oncoming traffic). Vehicles, animals and pedestrians who don't see you coming. Everything will try to kill or hurt you and/ or trash your bike. Practise braking somewhere safe. Braking too harshly can be just a troublesome as not braking effectively enough. Esp at speed you need to get used to stopping distances. Easy to go fast. Not so easy to slow down/ stop if not enough room ahead. The Birds linked brakes are "unusual". Applying front brake gives ⅔rds front brake ⅓rd rear… the usual balance to apply in normal conditions. Same true (but in reverse for the rear). So that removes some discretion to apply only front or only back compared to what you learnt on. Also, it means the Bird tends to "sit down" under braking with less "thrown forward" compared to other bikes. Delinking is possible via a kit. I haven't delinked but some have. Worth knowing if the bike you buy is OEM or delinked.
6. You are in control of the throttle. It's only a quarter turn from 0 to max. 1st gear goes from 0-70mph before it red lines (2.3seconds later) and you have 6 gears! You do the maths. You'll pop the front wheel or worse, flip her over if you twist too suddenly or dump the clutch (not just in 1st gear).
7. Check that you can get insured for a Bird. Here in the UK with only 7hrs riding experience you'd probably not even be able to get a quote else it would be stupidly expensive. So you may buy her but find you can't use her. Check the insurance situation before buying.
8. Never park with your nose downhill or side stand downhill. It's closer to rolling off the stand esp if given a minor knock or nudge, falling over or an extra problem to reverse. Pushing a Bird backwards uphill isn't the sensible choice if it can be avoided. Beware gravel drives!
9. Tyres: always best you can afford, keep in very good condition and keep at correct pressure (TPMS aftermarket systems are great these days). Poor tyres will have you off more easily and a Bird has immense performance so needs proper shoes (no cheapo retreads). Same is true for chains, sprockets and brake pads. Top quality, keep on top of maintenance.
10. Get yourself a trickle charger/ battery tender. The bikes electrics are one of it's known weaker points. Pushing her home is a major workout.

11. Pillions: best not take one for quite a while until you know the bike. However, if they aren't an experienced biker in their own right
a) never let them mount (or dismount) without you being ready and in full control of balancing the bike
b) don't let them mount/ dismount like with a horse (i.e NO to full weight on near side peg while throwing leg over. They tip you over. Stay on ground, slide leg over).
c) tell them to look over the shoulder matching the corner you are turning thru (right turn, right shoulder etc). This helps you turn. Worst case (esp if a hefty passenger) you end up understearing. Above 140mph you need them to warn you if changing shoulder looking over. Air is quite thick above 120mph and the change of airflow can whip your head suddenly sideways if not forewarned.
d) Unless they have arms like a gorilla tell them to hang onto you round your waist and sit tight close up. Nothing worse than hitting the anchors and having your pillion slam into your back, head butt your lid and suddenly transfer massive force thru your arms (rem they can always brace against the tank, keeping weight off your arms)!
e) Sit still. Tell them not to wriggle to get comfy while you are at slow speed (esp filtering between traffic). They may set up a sudden wobble and you could clip something in passing
f) 100% gear, 100% of the time for pillion too.

This is all doable without harm if you are prepared to be disciplined, cautious and take it in manageable stages. I've had my Bird 25yrs (dropped 3 times (most recently a few months back when I slipped on grit and a side wind caught the bike at the same time which pinned me against a wall… no damage to the bike but hurt like hell being pinned let alone struggling to right her), been off it 3 times (never at high speed… max I've been was 165mph but my pillion was upset so had to slow. Birds theoretically can do over 180mph). Latest crash (hit by a car pulling out without seeing me) was almost three years ago and I'm only now almost fully healed (and that was from an accident at 5-10 mph).

Whatever you decide to ride in the short term, ride defensively, assume everyone else hasn't seen you so be prepare to take evasive action. But overall have fun… Birds (whenever you get yours) are utterly fabulous! I grin like an idiot every time I ride mine!

Regards Mallow1
Hi Rio,

Print this reply off and read it quite often, There is a lifetime of advice on there,
Best write up of riding bikes Ive seen for a while,
Ive been riding bikes for 59 years, Birds for 14 years,

If your riding in the Twistys, Leave it in second gear, It does 212 KPH in second gear,
So plenty of variables for all kinds of roads, with out worrying about changing gear,

Cheers, Brian,
 

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Too kind Deadman. That's a mix of advice I was given 40 yrs ago peppered with observations I wish I had been told! Defo have made less mistakes because of it all.

Funny as fk helping mates buy their first bike. They always go for the shiny shiny best example in the shop. I go straight to the battered ones and find the mechanically sound one (checking wheel alignment, brakes, fluids, bars straightness, ease of cold start, clutch etc).

One mate reluctantly followed my advice. Road it home and promptly dropped it trying to park up. Got up embarrased but very glad he didn't buy the more expensive gleamingly clean one (which now would have shaved a reasonable amount off it's resale value). I followed him a week later and told him he needed to calm down and not gun it for every gap in the traffic. I told him he'd have an accident within a few weeks if he didn't. Three days later he wrote it off and fractured his pelvis. Once he passed his licence he switched to a hog with a custom paint job on the tank. Dropped that too on the way home so went back to the painter same day to have it resprayed. Artist was gutted and we just looked at each other like he knew his work would get trashed again!

Other funny one was a girlfriend dropping her shiny shiny first bike doing a u-turn in the garage parking lot, stalled and dropped it when she understeared and put the nose into the kerb downhill trying to push it backwards. She was furious with herself for not listening to me. Headstrong red head!

I've had a cardboard box under my front wheel while braking. Scary a fk as it turned into a ski till I reacted to release the brake and roll off it. Yep it would have worn thru eventually but I'd have hit the car in front by then or kissed tge tarmac if I'd tried to steer round it. Cold sweat just remembering that one!

Happy days!
 

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Too kind Deadman. That's a mix of advice I was given 40 yrs ago peppered with observations I wish I had been told! Defo have made less mistakes because of it all.

Funny as fk helping mates buy their first bike. They always go for the shiny shiny best example in the shop. I go straight to the battered ones and find the mechanically sound one (checking wheel alignment, brakes, fluids, bars straightness, ease of cold start, clutch etc).

One mate reluctantly followed my advice. Road it home and promptly dropped it trying to park up. Got up embarrased but very glad he didn't buy the more expensive gleamingly clean one (which now would have shaved a reasonable amount off it's resale value). I followed him a week later and told him he needed to calm down and not gun it for every gap in the traffic. I told him he'd have an accident within a few weeks if he didn't. Three days later he wrote it off and fractured his pelvis. Once he passed his licence he switched to a hog with a custom paint job on the tank. Dropped that too on the way home so went back to the painter same day to have it resprayed. Artist was gutted and we just looked at each other like he knew his work would get trashed again!

Other funny one was a girlfriend dropping her shiny shiny first bike doing a u-turn in the garage parking lot, stalled and dropped it when she understeared and put the nose into the kerb downhill trying to push it backwards. She was furious with herself for not listening to me. Headstrong red head!

I've had a cardboard box under my front wheel while braking. Scary a fk as it turned into a ski till I reacted to release the brake and roll off it. Yep it would have worn thru eventually but I'd have hit the car in front by then or kissed tge tarmac if I'd tried to steer round it. Cold sweat just remembering that one!

Happy days!
Thats a mix I learnt the hard way over a life time of riding,
Been down the road many many times, But when your riding on or over the limits, Some thing has to give sooner or later,
Such is life when your enjoying your self on the extreme edge, I expect to go down the road again, Sooner or later,
Its no big deal to me, As long as I can ride home on whats left of the bike, Hahahahaha,
140 kays with a shattered broken shoulder, 500 kays with a broken collar bone, Too many kays to think about with full length gravel rash, Hahahaha, Gravel rash takes three weeks to heal, Metho stops it getting infected,

I Mentor Brand New Riders, Brand New Licence and no idea, I keep it very simple, One or two bits of info at a time,
Then ride and practice it,
Too much info goes over their head, They forget it almost instantly, So its a waste of time,
Max ride is about 160 kays in a day, Otherwise they get too tired and fall off, Or hit some thing because their brain has shut down,
I stress on them, Keep the speed down, 30 KPH is ample, If you dont think you can make the corner, Stop, Get of it and push it around the corner, Hahahaha Its safer,
We stop every few Kays to chat and give them a rest, Discuss what they are doing wrong, I always follow them,
After a day with me, They usually dont need Mentoring again as they are fairly confident to get them selves every where they want to go,
I take them over the Reefton Spur, Then home by the Black Spur, I teach them to ride, Not pussy foot around in car parks,
Both have Tite Twistys, Black Spur, Not quite as tite, But good riding experience for them,
 

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Hi Rio,

All these folks have given great advice. My recommendation would have been simpler: Put the 'Bird in the back of your garage and pick up a cheap bike under 400cc and do all your learning on something cheap, light, easy to pick up, and not too heart-breaking to bend. I've been riding for 16 years now, and put 50,000km (30,000 miles) on a 250cc Kawasaki in my first 18 months riding. That one was dropped a couple of times--once at speed on gravel--and took me on a 3,500km (2,200 mile) round-trip around the East coast of Oz. I tried a Blackbird after that trip, and still found it way too big and powerful. I rode another 10 years on a 750cc Suzuki getting used to middle-weight size and power before stepping over a 'Bird again, and finding it a great fit. I started riding in my 40's, so I also spent up on full riding gear from top to toe, and it saved my life. I ride rain, hail or shine from freezing temps up to 47C (116F) in that gear and it can be made comfortable for any of those conditions.

Hope nobody minds different advice from an old man (who plans to get much older yet!).

Revenant
Revanant,

Outstanding advice! I was going to post something similar, but you beat me to the post and did a better job than what I would have done.

If I could give your post a thousand likes I would. I just might print it and give it to every new rider who wants to jump on a Superbike.

Mods should make this a Sticky thread.

Rio,

I would only add that if you can afford it, and it is available in your area take some more track based training for the street.

The more skill and confidence that you build up on a smaller bike, the more you will enjoy the Bird, and the safer you will be.

My two favourite schools are below, but there are many other similar schools all over the States. Buy the Online Champ School from ridelikeachampion.com. It's worth every penny, especially for a beginner!



Mallow1 has taken the time to give you a very lengthy reply when he could be out riding. Take heed of everything that he has posted.

It is top heavy, At 5 MPH it will throw you off the bike if its not dead in line,
A characteristic of the bird, so you need good balance control and the core/upper body strength that Mallow mentions. I would add, strong legs help too, for moving the bike when stationary. The Bird can be shiny side down in a heartbeat at low speed. Practice a lot in an empty parking lot.

I like this youtube channel. Start with the low speed drills. Anybody can twist the throttle and ride fast. Fewer have good low speed skills. That's one way to pick out a rider who has good control of their machine.


Check your insurance rates as Mallow mentioned. Put the money towards some further training instead. Baby steps and you will have a helluva lot more fun down the road. Pun unintended, but relevant!

Print out the advice from Revanant, Mallow1 and Deadman, put them in a Folder and read them often. Three lifetimes of wisdom distilled into a few sentences.

Most of us 'oldies' did not have the skill enhancement opportunities that exist today and learnt through the 'School of Hard Knocks', LITERALLY! :( You can avoid that!


I'll end by saying that this is the forum that you spend a lot of time on once you start riding a Bird. There are some amazing people here who will help you whenever possible.

Mods, Please make this thread a Sticky!

Ross
 

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Hi Rio,

Print this reply off and read it quite often, There is a lifetime of advice on there,
Best write up of riding bikes Ive seen for a while,
Ive been riding bikes for 59 years, Birds for 14 years,

If your riding in the Twistys, Leave it in second gear, It does 212 KPH in second gear,
So plenty of variables for all kinds of roads, with out worrying about changing gear,

Cheers, Brian,
Hi Brian,

You forgot to mention the all important 12 inch risers that make the Bird so much more manageable and safer! :D

Image required so that Ultranoob Rio knows what I am talking about

I am only half kidding, because it is the truth.

IMHO, low bars are good only for riding in a tucked position and make everything else more difficult in real life street riding on a top heavy bike.

Cheers,

Ross
 

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Low bars are for riding in a straight line very fast, World records,
But with 12 inch risers and a Double Bubble windscreen, I can ride just as fast,
But I can chuck it thru the twistys very fast as well,
I chucked the Silver 06 one down the road at 78,000 Kays, Insurance company wrote it off, Sadly, All mine,
I have 108,000 Kays up on the 05 Blue one, 68,000 kays are mine,
Thats in 10 years of actual riding them, The other 4 years, I was Injured, Overseas, and No Licence,
 

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This thread has really taken on some life!

Rio, I'm sorry if this sounds like we are trying to push you away from a 'Bird, or to talk down the fun and excitement of your purchase. In reality, the message is far more nuanced and welcoming: You've picked up an amazing bike and one that can give you an extraordinary amount of pleasure and excitement to ride. She's a big girl with some "bad sister" tricks up her sleeve, but enough class to give you some warning and teach you along the way. I've had more fun riding since I started 16 years ago, than I have had in all the 40 years before that, and a lot of that fun has been on my 'Bird.

Mallow, Deadman, Calgary Bird and I simply urge you to look after yourself by walking before you try to run. I wanted to ride at 17, and may never have seen 20 if I'd tried it. Attitude is everything, and so is gradually building skills and hard sense along the way. Of course it's fun, or we wouldn't do it, but I'm reminded of a favourite expression (I can't remember where I first saw it):

"Good Judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." 😏

All the stunting videos and warp-speed numptiness on Youtube is fine for entertainment, but they won't prepare you for the pants-filling-terror of your first tank-slapper, for the unexpected lane-change of someone not watching for you, a car coming around the inside of a blind corner and crossing the lines as you hug them coming the other way, or the sickening heartache of feeling a bike start to fall and knowing you can't catch it. All of these are less likely and more manageable on a smaller bike that you know in your heart of hearts will leave your care with more scuffs (or more fresh paint) than when you bought it. Training, skill-building, mentoring, real practice, and really good quality riding gear go a long way to helping new riders become experienced riders.

Thank you, Mallow, Deadman and Calgary Bird for your kind words and for adding your diverse experience to this thread.

Cheers,

Revenant
 
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