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An eliminator will have the proper resistance to fool the ECM, but your cats won't like it much so you might look into getting that extra baggage removed.
 

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I've already swapped out the OEM cans so no probs there.

It seems a 330ohm 1/2W resistor across the two pins opposite the release clip on the connector does the job of an eliminator. I've since found some posts on the web for VFR's and Blackbirds that suggest this is decent fix for the issue. For the pennies this costs it seems worth trying .... unless there's a down side?
 

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I don't know enough about the mapping to come up with any real down side. The O2-sensor equipped units appear to use a closed-loop map while the rest use an open-loop, but I'm not sure what implications that holds for you, other than that it will fix the mixture at whatever that resistance dictates in the mapping. I don't think you'll do any damage trying it out.
 

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Ok, ScottyUK you need me a fellow UK resident who's contributed to this thread and has real life experience of this rather than assumptions/guesses etc. from our respected moderator. :) No offence intended here Sir.

1. If you just pull the lambda sensor (O2 sensor) lead, the ECU will throw the FI error light on the dash
2. You just need an O2 eliminator, be it dynjojet powercommander one like I have or the resistor equivalent insulating tape bodge. I decided to spend the cash on the proper one as its a fully sealed unit with the correct connector for the terminals the lambda sensor plugs into. This should actually be called lambda sensor eliminator but hey - we don't make the rules. :) In case there is any confusion you just need ONE O2 Eliminator, two are required for VFRs
2. You do NOT need a powercommander unless you want to get a custom map done for a full system. The maps powercommander provide for replacement cans do next to nothing looking at the fuelling map breakdown. I have experience of the PC3 through a mate and it being fitted to my old CBR600Fi where it made a massive difference to fuelling and associated fuel range on the bike with OE exhaust fitted.
3. I was experiencing surging with the OE exhausts, which this eliminator solved immediately. I have since swapped to Micron Race and then subsequently for MOT/Legal reasons Road legal Microns both with replacement link pipes (which obviously removes both cats). The bike runs great and has no issues, no mapping required from my experiences.
4. I've been running the O2 eliminator for almost as long as I've had the bike which I got in July 2008.

Any more questions please ask.
 

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THANK YOU !!!

I'm very glad to see you're still on here and posting as now I'm confident that this will do the trick!

I'm also on a 2006 Iron Nail, travel in and out of London, came from a CBR600Fi and have Scott in my name - Spooky!! If the fix was good for you then it must be good for me. Your experience means that I don't have to worry about whether the fueling is fecked by this as by now you'll have been through various services/plug changes etc so this really has put my mind at rest.

I've got Blueflames exhausts on so no cats to be worried about either.

Many thanks. I will post my experience on here once I've done it. :D

[edit] p.s. Have you ever had it dyno'ed ?
 

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No problem, I'm still on the subscribed list on this thread so I got sent an email when you resurrected it. :) I still look on here from time to time. Mainly I'm waiting on GrahamUK to get back to me about replacement rear brake caliper kits but thats another story. LOL

Gareth60 did a lot of the leg work on working this out with some other valuable contributions for other forum members too, I also tested these thoughts/findings out and found that it is indeed the miracle cure. It sure was irritating the hell out of me on the daily commute across London.

No I've not had my bike dyno'd.. however I can tell you it def went better on the Micron Race cans than the road legal ones with regard to low down wide throttle openings.
In real terms I've had it legally to the stop in 6th on the autobahn in Germany with all my Givi luggage fitted there are no performance issues with the bike.. might that contribute to the fact this eliminator works ok? LOL

Interested to hear how you get on.

Cheers
 

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Ok, ScottyUK you need me a fellow UK resident who's contributed to this thread and has real life experience of this rather than assumptions/guesses etc. from our respected moderator. :) No offence intended here Sir.
No offense taken whatsoever. I had been hoping that either you or someone else with some experience would jump in here. Thanks for clearing everything up!
 

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Well I called around a few Dynojet dealers and they basically had all the O2 eliminators in the world .... apart from the one I needed ! One said they'd check so whilst out and about I popped into Maplins and bought a couple of the resistors.....then I had a call to say that a dealer 20 miles away had an eliminator so I wasted all of 48 pence!! ;)

When I picked up the eliminator I had a chat with the guy at the tuning centre. He said he could quite see how this worked but to be aware that not all bikes, even of the same model and year, will run the same. Some may be rich and some lean. Therefore although this will work on some bikes it may not be so effective on others. Of course the best way is a dyno run to get it checked which I will do in time.

I've just installed it which was easier than I thought. The connector was easy to get to and to ensure I pulled the correct one I started up the bike with nothing connected. It ran fine and I had the Fi light on. I traced the cable to be doubly sure. I installed the eliminator, started it and the Fi light went out. The disconnected lead (that goes to the exhaust sensor) got taped up and then secured in that handy cable clip that the cable runs through. Job done in about 15mins which would have been quicker but for the removal and replacement of my Baglux tank cover and one of the tank bolts took a minute or two to relocate.

So it's all done :D ..... and over the next day or two I'll give her a run.

Thanks guys for the help. I'm still staggered there's so few threads about this across the forums!
 

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Well I called around a few Dynojet dealers and they basically had all the O2 eliminators in the world .... apart from the one I needed ! One said they'd check so whilst out and about I popped into Maplins and bought a couple of the resistors.....then I had a call to say that a dealer 20 miles away had an eliminator so I wasted all of 48 pence!! ;)

When I picked up the eliminator I had a chat with the guy at the tuning centre. He said he could quite see how this worked but to be aware that not all bikes, even of the same model and year, will run the same. Some may be rich and some lean. Therefore although this will work on some bikes it may not be so effective on others. Of course the best way is a dyno run to get it checked which I will do in time.

I've just installed it which was easier than I thought. The connector was easy to get to and to ensure I pulled the correct one I started up the bike with nothing connected. It ran fine and I had the Fi light on. I traced the cable to be doubly sure. I installed the eliminator, started it and the Fi light went out. The disconnected lead (that goes to the exhaust sensor) got taped up and then secured in that handy cable clip that the cable runs through. Job done in about 15mins which would have been quicker but for the removal and replacement of my Baglux tank cover and one of the tank bolts took a minute or two to relocate.

So it's all done :D ..... and over the next day or two I'll give her a run.

Thanks guys for the help. I'm still staggered there's so few threads about this across the forums!
Excellent, glad you managed to source and fit the official eliminator.
Have you thought that the dynojet guy might be trying to just drum up business at all.. being that thats his job? ;)
Seeing as we BOTH have 06 models I'll be very surprised if you need do anything other than ride it now the eliminator is fitted.

I think the lack of threads on this is caused by a few things.
European models ran past production years for US, so I don't believe anyone in the US has a post 2003 model. This lean surge is caused by emissions requirements on later model FI birds only. Honda had to stop sellings birds in europe as they didn't meet the new emissions standards.
US Models on the whole (maybe CA is different?) didn't/don't have the same emissions regs - note our Aussie co-owners have noted similar issues as they have the same basic bike/cats and emissions system as us.
If you don't ride your bird in the town/city regularly you simply won't notice it as you'll not be at the low revs range required to experience this.
 

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Well after my ride I'm convinced! It makes a really big difference. Hopefully now when I'm out riding with my local 'Advanced' group I'll no longer be thinking that it looks like I have crap throttle control!!

I did get my bike dyno'ed as I planned due to my new exhuasts and that showed it was running rich but that doesn't appear to be anything at all to do with the O2 eliminator.

I'm now pondering whether to keep these can's (which would lean off the mix if I removed the big baffle but then it's too loud for me) and getting a PCiii to go with it or whether to stick the OEM cans back on.

Regardless of that the £20 O2 fix now has another fan.

Thanks a lot guys.
 

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Good news! ;) Another convert in the O2 Eliminator club.
If you're bothered that your bike is running rich get it mapped with the baffles in place with a PC3.
Personally the OE exhaust cans and link pipes are so heavy and quiet I wouldn't ever go back to them esp as there is no legal requirement to run cats on bikes currently.

What did the bike make BTW power/torque wise?
 

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It's very rich i.e. about 12.0 for most of the time.

Power was 137.3bhp @ 9.5k rpm and 80 ft/lb @ about 8k.

He suggested it's likely I'd get to 144ish with a PCiii, K&N and baffles out.

The curves look smooth and flat but it's too rich. He reckons he can lean it off by 15-20% at the top end .... which will help with economy and prevent blackening of those expensive spark plugs.

I think you're right about the baffles ... although it seems sad to restrict the bikes potential. Maybe I could get maps for with and without. It all turns into expense though. I've a 16k service, pad change, tyre change, MOT, possible chain/sprockets plus MOT on other bike etc all coming up.

Ponder ponder....
 

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Ok interesting news, not bad on the figures front too. I guess get it mapped based on how you will use the bike the most. i.e. quiet or loud
My biggest disappointment from going from the Micron race cans (even when fitted with aftermarket db killers) I had fitted initially to the Micron road legal cans was the change in low down response for the worse. The road legal cans do have removable baffles but I'll just keep them in place as its loud enough for me - certainly much louder than OE cans as I said before.
I may if I keep the bird after my euro tour in may look to go the PC3 and custom map route. I'm just wary of spending too much money more if I decide to replace it.
I'm 24k+ miles on mine now too.
 

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Most of my riding is commuting and I've been noticing similar problems with '06 bird recently; surging at low speeds, rough/fluctuating idle, gerky acceleration and deceleration.
I'm pretty sure most of the symptoms have always been there, they've just gotten worse lately, so I thought I'd give this 'fix' a go.

I must say I am hugely impressed with the result.
My idle is now steady, acceleration and deceleration have totally smoothed out, and there is no more surging at low speeds! :thumb:
My daily commute now excites me again like it did when I first got the 'bird a bit over a year ago! :D
 

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I recently bought a stock standard 2005 Blackbird. A few days after I bought it I noticed the lean surge problem (for anything between 2k and 4k rpm). It was getting damn annoying for the last 2 weeks and then I found this thread. Thanks for all the info guys. I made the O2 Sensor eliminator this morning and went for a ride. What a difference. It is a huge improvement. I will need to see what the mileage is like in a few weeks and I do wonder if the catalytic converters may end up with a problem. I hope not. But I love this bike again (like I did after the test ride).

I've also seen via the net that this problem isn't restricted to Blackbirds. It seems this crazy idea of having the mixture adjusted in a closed loop is a problem for many types of bike. Bizarre why the manufacturers don't do something about this bad design.

Anyway, I wanted to add some info that I learned in the last few days. And some pics.

To get under the tank you need to take the seat off and undo the two bolts at the rear of the tank. The two bolts each have a big rubber grommet beneath them, so be careful not to lose them. When you lift the back of the tank be careful to not pull out any fuel lines (there seem to be about 3 of them right underneath the tank and I found at least one was concealed and nearly stretched too far when I lifted it).

You also need to pull the black lugs out of the rubber grommets on the plastic side panel (see the red arrow on the picture below). Prop up the back of the tank with a piece of wood. Or if you want to get serious you can probably lift the front of the tank by this method (Lifting the tank on the Honda Blackbird). I didn't.

To find the O2 sensor plug, trace the O2 sensor wire from the right hand side of the bike (by the brake pedal) up under the tank to where it goes under a black rubber cover near the left side of the bike. Lift up the black rubber and you'll find the plug (see yellow arrow on picture below and the zoom view on the second picture).

Balckbird O2 Plug.JPG Balckbird O2 Plug2.jpg

To undo the plug, you need a small screwdriver. Slide it in from the top plug side (the top left one in the photo) and lift the small lever. The plug then comes apart when you pull them.

The O2 sensor has 4 wires, 2 for a heater element and 2 for the sensor readings. The black/white and black/green wires are the heater (O2 sensors use a small heater to heat the exhaust gas so it can be tested by the sensor). The green/orange and orange/white wires are for the sensor. The sensor generates electricity down these wires of between 0 and 1 volt depending on how much oxygen is in the exhaust gas (and therefore how lean or rich the mixture is).

The 330 Ohm resister (Orange,Orange,Brown,Gold stripes) needs to go between the two heater wires (black/white & black/green wires). This then fools the ECM (ECU) into thinking the heater is still attached. The other two wires can be left disconnected because the ECM will just see that there is zero voltage on these wires and will therefore think the engine is lean and so not try and lean it out (so it will tell the engine to use a constant fuel injection time from the ECM map, so no surge, yay).

After I took the photos, I used a cable tie to hold the resister in place and then put a bit of tape around the plug plus I taped the plug that goes to the O2 sensor so it doesn't fall down and get caught up in something.

When you put the tank back down, you need to make sure the side lugs engage (red arrows on photo) and you may need to push the tank forward a bit (if it has slipped back) so you can get the 2 bolts back in place.

One thing I didn't do was disconnect the battery as suggested by JohnS on page 4 of this thread. I haven't been able to find any info on adaptive learning in the Blackbird ECM and I figure if there is, it will sort itself out over time as I ride more. I'd love to know if anyone has any more info on Honda Blackbird ECM adaptive learning and what it may or may not do.

Good luck.
 

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so I've got to ask one question, why did honda change the FPR to produce higher fuel pressure in the rail, sure this has the effect of increasing the mixture, the pressure went from 43psi to near 50psi with the later FPR, mine is running rich right now but may be due to additional issues but the 50psi FPR certaintly isn't helping, I dont have an 02 censor - but still.
 

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Compression test buddy I had a cbr f4i that did this turned out to be a bad piston ring bike only had 5000 miles on it sold it that week
 

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Aroberts, your solution is OK for testing purposes, but I would not keep it like that for a long time. Maybe the resistor can come lose after a while due to the vibrations of the engine. Replacing your resistor by an O2 eliminator is a cheap solid solution. It's just an idea.
 

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with rings there'd be other symptoms like burning/using oil, it doesn't burn or use a drop, plus when I did the dollar bill test on the exhaust - it nearly sucked it out of my hand right up in there lol based on history and symptoms I'm pretty sure it's exhaust valves on the outside 1 & 4 pots

sorry for o/t post to the op
 

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Aroberts, your solution is OK for testing purposes, but I would not keep it like that for a long time. Maybe the resistor can come lose after a while due to the vibrations of the engine. Replacing your resistor by an O2 eliminator is a cheap solid solution. It's just an idea.
Hi. I put a cable tie around the plug and the resistor to hold it in place after I took the photo. Maybe you are right. I'll let you know if it comes loose.
 
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