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What milage do you get form a tank full?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Bird is a 2000 FI and I get about 110 miles out of it. It's the only thing that lets it down, being pricey to run as I only use Shell V-Power (99 Octane). It's also black, so being the fastest colour might count against the MPG?

Among others, I also have a 1999 VFR800FI and it too was juicy until I noticed a vacuum hose had come of off what I think was the air pressure sensor. That being said, I lifted the tank but couldn't see any unhooked hoses except for a drain hose, no sign sign of fuel staining from leaking fuel, and couldn't smell fuel either.

I ride for about 25 mins, each way, on either free flowing dual carriage way and small back roads or if I go the other way its all empty back roads, single track with passing places. Never get stuck in stop go traffic (filtering if the A303 ever gets jammed up), and all in the country side.

I have had some great replies like, checking the oil level and smell in case the fuel is filling the engine! Checked the oil yesterday, bright yellow and clear oil, looks new and the level was about 35% up the dipstick (do we screw the dipstick in to take the reading or just take the level with the stick sitting on the top of the case (which is what I did). I think it's a touch low so will do a fresh oil and filter change because I don't know what brand/spec the current oil is for me to top up. No fuel smell from the oil either.

FPR hose looks like it's been replaced or someone has trimmed a bit off the end (frayed or split end of the hose?) because there is a jubilee clip on there now. I forgot to take it off as I was distracted by the cam chain tensioner (will be starting a thread on that, shortly).

She starts on the button, quickly up to temp, runs well, a bit rattly (because of the cam chain tensioner), but seems sweet. She's just a bit expensive to run at £1.42 a litre (works out at about $10 a gallon but I think a UK gallon is a bit bigger than a US one?).

So just putting this out there to pick brains, cheers all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I get around 185 miles, then my fuel light comes on. 97 carbie. Would say that's with pretty normal street riding as well.
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That would be fantastic, are the carbed versions better on fuel economy than the FI ones? I'd have thought it'd be the other way around? With that sort of mileage I could justify using her all the time, as it is I might have to use the VFR and keep the Bird for best, which would be a shame!
 

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As this is a 2000 FI then you must have a low fuel light on the dash. Is this 110 miles from full to low fuel light on? If so, this is not great economy, should see 180+ miles to low fuel light with normal riding. Check the vac line on the FPR. It should be bone dry. You may have a pinhole leak thru the diaphragm (pulling raw fuel) that it big enough to affect economy but not enough to contaminate the oil (yet).


PS: high test fuel not required here. All things being equal, low octane fuel actually contains more energy/kg than high octane. As long as pre-ignition does not occur, which it wont thanks to the knock sensor, just go with the cheap stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As this is a 2000 FI then you must have a low fuel light on the dash. Is this 110 miles from full to low fuel light on? If so, this is not great economy, should see 180+ miles to low fuel light with normal riding. Check the vac line on the FPR. It should be bone dry. You may have a pinhole leak thru the diaphragm (pulling raw fuel) that it big enough to affect economy but not enough to contaminate the oil (yet).


PS: high test fuel not required here. All things being equal, low octane fuel actually contains more energy/kg than high octane. As long as pre-ignition does not occur, which it wont thanks to the knock sensor, just go with the cheap stuff.
It's not quite to the low level light but from the full fuel gage to the red, thanks for the heads up on the fuel reg, off to research that now and will take the hose of at the workshop tomorrow to see if it's damp.

Interesting about the fuel though, are you saying that our Birds are as happy to run on the cheaper supermarket fuel? I've always used the V-Power after feeling the difference when changing over on a Speed Triple and liked the fact it has more cleaner in it(?) and supposed to look after the fuel system in general, better? Changing would certainly bring the fuel bill down!
 

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Run it ALL the way to the low fuel light to give apples to apples comparison. Low fuel light means 30 miles remaining, although I never actually tested this part.

If you burn at least 1 tank every 2 weeks, then fuel with cleaner in it (snake oil mystery blend) not required IMO. If you are still concerned, then buy cleaner separately and use it at will.
 

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Fuel light on at 140ish ( when I have let it ) UK 2001 Fi Bird.
Returned it back to oem air and oil filters, and I have changed the FPR and plugs so I am guessing it varies greatly from bike to bike, I am a big bloke 17 and a half stone and I ride carefully these days ( old fart ) so I reckon 160 to 170 to a tank full of super unleaded would be a fair reckoning although I never let the fuel light come on if I can help it as previuosly stated.
 

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Why not strap a full can of fuel on the back and run it until you run out ( not ideal I know ) but at least you will see a true measure of things ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Why not strap a full can of fuel on the back and run it until you run out ( not ideal I know ) but at least you will see a true measure of things ?
Was thinking off doing exactly that, would be good to check the low level light works and see what I can squeeze out of her.
 

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Why not calculate the actual fuel mileage? That would be more informative than just filling tank at 110 miles. How many gallons does it take to fill the tank after 110 miles? Divide 110 (or whatever mileage since last fill up) by however many gallons you put in to fill tank and post your results.

Fuelly.com shows that average seems to be mid thirties mpg. I typically get around 37 mpg (US gallons). I would expect you to get around 30 mpg 44mpg (I adjusted the wrong direction) for imperial gallons.
 

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i see similar fuel economy (25-30 mpg) on my 2001 while commuting but, i'm riding the snot out of it... while on more sedate group rides, i see 35-40 mpg.

for your riding habits, yours sounds a bit low.
 

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… I typically get around 37 mpg (US gallons). I would expect you to get around 30 mpg for imperial gallons.
On my '97 carbie, my ave. city commuting (25 mins 6 miles each way) I get 100-125 miles before fuel light comes on. Motorway long journeys usually 185-190 miles before light comes on.

My best ever (hit the red E fuel line, reserve light unlight) was 205.7 miles (330 km) before I then refuelled (18.03L, 97 RON/Octane).

Scale up from 18L to full 21L capacity of a carbie tank would be 240 miles (385 km).

That's 51.25 mpg (imp) or 43.7 mpg (US) if I have my maths right. Wow!

After 24yrs ownership of the same BB that's the best I've achieved to date irrespective of road conditions, bike age etc.

Context: one up (17½ st), top box fully loaded (Givi maxia E52), no panniers, medium rucksack/ daysack on my back; mix of winding country lanes (1st 50 miles), highway stop start (0-30 mph queueing re next 50 miles), 70-90mph max sustained for next 100 miles (bar 50 mph 30 mile roadworks). Weather stormy, cross winds, driving rain for 50% of time (1" surface water max), clear for remainder...8hr drive, three stops for the full 365 miles inc front tyre swift deflate...down to 12 psi! Usually 42psi in both).
 

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Why not strap a full can of fuel on the back and run it until you run out ( not ideal I know ) but at least you will see a true measure of things ?
That's a good idea. I did something similar rather than trusting gauges. Ended up getting close to 400 km out of the tank. And found that reserve fuel was 50 km rather than 30, if riding gently. Believe it or not there was still fuel in the tank when I tipped a few litres in at 389.0 kms.
Are there any fuel leaks anywhere else in the system or evaporation occurring, like around a loose fitting fuel cap?
P.S. My fuel test was done at riding speeds of 60 - 100.0 kph. In reality, when I ride normally I get around 280-300.0 km out of a tank. When I ride hard, get 200.0 or less out of tank.
 

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I run an 18th front sprocket, 200 miles to a tank and the speedo now is almost exactly now what the sat nav speed reads.

I changed the sprocket to do continental runs with some mates in bikes and cars. Some of the sporty cars were looking for fuel at 200 miles, so we could all keep together.
 

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97 csrb. 6 litres per 100km highway/ country road riding. Have ridden with FI bikes that got same or slightly better. So you should get at least 300km to a tank before worrying about running out of fuel. That's 91 octane.
 

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Not hijacking the thread, but I was told by a bike mechanic never to put 98 octance in a Bird. In Australia we have 91, 95 and 98. I can't recal why he said not to do this but given that 98 octance is only recommended for the latest vehicles it does make some sense. Do others run 98 and why would this fuel be no good in Bird?
 

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Because higher octane means slower more controlled burn in HIGH compression engines 12.5 and above.
Running it in a lower compression motor will actually over time cause deposit buildup IE carbon.
 

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Not hijacking the thread, but I was told by a bike mechanic never to put 98 octance in a Bird. In Australia we have 91, 95 and 98. I can't recal why he said not to do this but given that 98 octance is only recommended for the latest vehicles it does make some sense. Do others run 98 and why would this fuel be no good in Bird?
In the UK from September we will have no real choice as we switch to E10 unleaded but it woud seem that any Honda motorcyce built from 1993 will run on it
However in France a few years ago my Fi light came on with fault 25 a couple of miles after having refueled ? Not saying it was that,but my petrol camping stove ( and my mates ) where extremely hard to ignite with said fuel also.
All corrected itself however after filling up with super unleaded once back in Plymouth a few days later.
 

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I've seen this at times from some stations. Usually switch stations and the vehicles back to normal.
 

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Because higher octane means slower more controlled burn in HIGH compression engines 12.5 and above.
Running it in a lower compression motor will actually over time cause deposit buildup IE carbon.
Yeah, okay, makes sense. Cheers.
I once had to use 98 in the Bird and found it was down on power. Would 91 do any harm? Thanks again Bees.
 
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