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Discussion Starter #1
Is it okay to lightly scuff the lower fork legs and spray them with matching silver paint? Not looking for complete restoration just to refresh them. Thanks.
 

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Hey Nato fellow fighter pilot! I recommend a light sanding with 300 or 500 grit metal sandpaper, add base coat then silver paint. Base coat needs a ruff surface to grab onto and silver paint will grab onto base coat! Of course make sure others bike parts are well covered to avoid over spray. Good luck! Cheers!
 

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I have friends who have had forks suffering from psoriasis and sanded them and painted them with silver Hammerite with a brush and they have always looked fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's great. Thanks guys.
"psoriasis" 😂
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey Nato fellow fighter pilot! I recommend a light sanding with 300 or 500 grit metal sandpaper, add base coat then silver paint. Base coat needs a ruff surface to grab onto and silver paint will grab onto base coat! Of course make sure others bike parts are well covered to avoid over spray. Good luck! Cheers!
G'day mate. When you say base coat, are you meaning just some sort of undercoat/primmer?
 

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I have friends who have had forks suffering from psoriasis and sanded them and painted them with silver Hammerite with a brush and they have always looked fine.
wow hammered effect forks, the bike will look like a machine tool 😀
 

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The solid alloy content of the lower forks can be painted but I don't recommend using a brush to do it. I was a pointer for 13 years, and I have painted nearly everything from ships to bike tanks to buildings and structure and equipment. That was a life long past for me. I have found on bike forks that you can certainly sand out the oxidation but you will likely need to start with the lower grade paper, that is, using a slightly coarser grade and then work up with finer grades to get a perfect finish. Depending on what you want the forks to look like, you don't actually have to paint them with a color. If you remove them from the bike, you can sand them all around, work your way up to , say 1200 or higher grade (use the black wet/dry paper and water sand them) and then polish them with a polisher and some machine buffing compound. This produces a mirror finish. Immediately afterwards, wipe the fork down with wax and grease remover and do a thorough job. Wipe it down the first time with a single clean rage (lint free no contamination) and then wipe it down twice more (even three times) with two rags each time; one rag is wet and puts on the liquid W+G remover and the other takes it off. It won't take long as you aren't wiping down the whole car or bike just one part at a time. Make sure you have clean hands and the rags are clean. Tape off the part of the forks which are steel and the seals. Get two pack polyurethane clear and (hopefully you know how to use a spray gun) and spray the forks with clear. The clear goes off and I have found that it will last at least two or three seasons of high speeds, .... err no no, I mean two or three good seasons (even longer) at lawful moderate speeds if you wax them periodically. If the look of the polished forks doesn't flip your switches, then you can use a color underneath the clear which some of my friends on bikes have used candy colors, metallics, anything really, but you cannot sand all the way up to the really fine finish. The grade scale in Oz is different to the grade scale in the USA. I think you can do the paint with a 600 Grit wet/dry, but the others above are correct that you should prime first and the candy will need some bronze powder spray or silver depending on the color. You can even use pearls if you want. Put your surfacer on wet but no sags and bags. Depending on the type of paint you use, (laquers, polyurethane, synthetic enamel, acrylic enamel, water base, epoxy, etc) you might be able to shortcut the process by putting on an undercoat and then just a few seconds before it dries, start your color without sanding. You have to know how to do this, though, and maybe you should experiment a bit before you mess up... I mean before you paint the forks. Using candy colors is good if it matches your tank and the front fenders (guards in Oz) but you will have to live with the outcome or bear the burden of repeats if you don't get your processes correct. Lots of help videos online. Hope this helps... longest post I ever made.
 

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Awesome breakdown of the paint process Academic!
I cleaned mine up when removed and being rebuilt, but really only gave them a scrub with a scouring pad (scotch brite) then cleaned with thinners thoroughly twice before applying two layers of etch primer and a light touch up with 800 wet and dry paper. Another wipe down with thinners Followed with about 5 coats of high temp engine enamel (spray can - not sure which brand now)
And cured under the heat of my halogen work lamps for 12-15 hrs
They still look great after about 10 thousand highway kms. And nearly 3 years of semi tropical weather in country Qld.
 

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Good stuff mate. I am down in the Gong and moving into the southern ranges soon... maybe. It is a good ride down. I go to Cairns and T'ville sometimes. Coffee is hot and the beer is cold here. Funny thing about this post thread, I am going to have to do my forks as soon as I get the new shop together. Still moving atm. I hate moving. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for taking time out of your lives to help me, I appreciate it. It sounds like a lot of us have had to address the paint work on the lower fork legs and that there is quite a few ways to go about it. The polishing route would be good but I like stock for some reason. I'll post some pics when done. Thanks again...keep posting, makes for excellent reading.
 
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