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Now as for this fuel door...is the ignition key supposed to go all the way into it or just part way? I ask because the key definitely does not seem to want to go fully in as it does with the ignition. So far I've been continuing to soak the key hole down as I'm doing other work and gently testing it but no success yet.



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I was in the garage today working on the brakes and I thought I'd just check if my ignition key/ fuel cap key inserts all the way into the lock and I can report it does not go in all the way.

It seems to just go in as far as the cut section of the key blade. You will also need to push down hard on the front edge of the flue cap to help the key to turn.

I hope this will help you to get the cap open!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Appreciate the heads up on the key but I cant get more than a cm or so of the key in. Since I figured out the clutch MC & finally got the bike on it's center stand the fuel door is just gonna have to be drilled out.

As for the clutch MC, I took it apart. The outer boot was pretty garbage but the rest of it looked very good. There was no fluid dropping from the reservoir down to where the piston sits (tested with the piton removed & fluid added with just gravity). So I gave all of it a quick degreasing wash with the usual Dawn soap. Of course after washing and blowing air through the fluid now flows freely out of the reservoir. Put everything back together & the clutch feels good to go now with a full flush done.

I think the next step will be to remove the fuel pump, empty the tank, & drill out the fuel door. Then I'll rinse out the fuel tank, test the fuel pump, throw on a new fuel door, and finally startup time
 

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Glad you got the Master sorted. Before you drill the lock
After fully draining it try inverting the tank and flushing the lock with PB Blaster. Get a paperclip to. You may have crud and dirt caught in the bottom of the tumbler. That is keeping the key from seating completely.
 

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Glad you got the Master sorted. Before you drill the lock
After fully draining it try inverting the tank and flushing the lock with PB Blaster. Get a paperclip to. You may have crud and dirt caught in the bottom of the tumbler. That is keeping the key from seating completely.
+1. Maybe even give the lock a good blast with compressed air as well as the paper clip treatment.
 

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If the inverted method with pb blaster doesn't work then how about have a locksmith take a look at it first to save the trouble of rekeying the tank/ignition or just the tank with the purchase of new key cylinder and all that. That's also a lot of metal that will be inside the tank afterwards 😳
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I took the tank off. Gonna end up giving it a thorough cleanup on the inside so the prospect of metal shavings from drilling the lock doesn't phase me at this point. As nice as it would have been to keep the original cap it's essentially at the point of impeding progress.

With the tank off I can see the coolant tank is empty, is there a preferred coolant type? I've seen some conflicting info in various places regarding what is the correct coolant to use. Looks like the weather may slow progress but hopefully I can work through all this soon enough.

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As long as it's aluminum compatible IE non Silicate formula your good.
 

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+1. Maybe even give the lock a good blast with compressed air as well as the paper clip treatment.
Rather than a paperclip (though try it first) a selection of lock pick tools has served me well in the past. Not so much to pick the lock per se but to help clear out crud. Some of the picks are shaped to very much (incidentally) help you extract crap or broken key tips lodged in there.
 

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Hey all, I just joined & I'm totally new to the scene. My brother has an old '02 CBR 1100xx that he's left sitting for years so I've decided to tackle it as a project and get it running. Full disclosure, I've never worked on or even ridden a motorcycle before. I'm not looking to start with the biggest bike out there, but it's available & if I can do some much needed basics (empty the fuel tank, change the oil/coolant/brake fluid, check & likely replace spark plugs, new air filter & battery, etc) I'd like to at least get it running and then go from there.

I do a good deal of work on my cars so I'm hoping to absorb some info on motorcycles along the way. Hopefully I don't need to ask stupid questions but I appreciate the info I've already been looking at quite a bit.
Hello! And welcome aboard fellow fighter pilot in training! As you will quickly find out the Blackbird is a magnificent machine! TAKE YOUR TIME!!! This bike can be unforgiving if you don't know what yur doing! LEARN the bike! AND just a suggestion... Until you've gotten use to the weight and torque I'd stay away from 5th and 6th gear! For now... GET USE TO THE BIKE! Everything you need to know about yur Blackbird can be found here! Take care, safe riding and welcome again to this fab group!
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I won't be learning the bike in the traditional sense just yet, I'm still sorting out cleaning out the fuel tank. Due to it's large size with small pockets which are difficult to reach I may try the electrolysis method. Never done it before but now seems as good a time as ever to go for it. I scrubbed a small area down with a scotch Brite pad as a test and it should clean up perfectly.

As far as coolant I'll probably just go with Prestone with Corguard...it's what I use for my car from the same era, which also has an aluminum radiator.

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Welcome from a fellow NYer. If you’re having trouble with the lock you might try a good penetrating oil like Kroil or ATF & acetone. In my experience no matter how much wd40 you use it doesn’t wick into the tight places to loosen things up as well as they do. If you don’t have any and are nearby you are welcome to borrow a bottle from me sometime. One other thing you might try is having a copy of your key made on a steel blank so you can put a little more pressure on it when you try turning it.
Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I ended up drilling out the lock. WD-40, penetrating fluid, pressing it down, banging it firmly with a hammer...nothing helped me get more than 1cm of the key into the lock over several days. After drilling it through & inspecting it I'm glad I did...it wasn't a battle that was going to be won otherwise.

Now I'm just waiting on a battery maintainer to complete my electrolysis setup. I'll test it out on a rusty C-clamp before going all in on the tank itself but I'm pretty confident it should work nicely. As an adden bonus I'll get to use the process on a few of my older rusty tools as well

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Mini update...after a few test runs on some old rusty tools I've started the electrolysis process on the gas tank. It'll probably take a few days to complete. The fuel pump is shot, which was kinda expected. I'll have to get a new pump, figure out how to strip down the whole unit and remove any rust off of it, then buy a new filter & some small pieces of fuel hose to replace the lines that sit within the tank as well.

Ideally I would have this done by the time electrolysis is finished so then I could screw it in place to seal the hole and swish around some 2 stroke oil as flash rust prevention. Worst case scenario I'll give it a few extra hours of electrolysis to remove any flash rust if things don't line up.
 

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Form
Old trick I've used
Drop the pump I a can if WD40 and let it set for a week or 2. Then give it some power
I've feed up a couple in tank pumps that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I appreciate the tip but I think this thing is done for. I think it'll be easier to just replace while it's out and know it's in working order with no corrosion issues, especially weighing the effort to get back into the tank if it doesnt work. I'd like to never have to remove those fuel lines again...I think I'm just over the smell of gasoline after pulling all these little pieces apart & rinsing the tank with more than 20 gallons of soapy water & still smelling gasoline lol
 

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Understand completely!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
A small update...life, weather, and unexpected side projects have got in the way a bit but the electrolysis has removed an incredible amount of rust scale from the inside of the gas tank. Definitely worth doing considering the minimal physical effort & progress made so far. I'll be running it a bit longer as these frequent rainy days combined with a few learning hiccups on the electrolysis process haven't allowed me to keep the process going continuously for very long in a single shot.
 

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Be curious on how the eletrolisis process works and what's involved.
 

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Be curious on how the eletrolisis process works and what's involved.
Not hard at all. I think the Duck has a thread on it. I know he was posting pics of doing it in a 5 gallon bucket.

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Be curious on how the eletrolisis process works and what's involved.
I can do a little write up when I get a chance...it's incredible for an oddly shaped and/or not fully accessible objects such as the inside of the gas tank. Also, very cheap relative to buying evaporust, etc provided you have a few basic items.
 
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