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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I put in new brake pads. I did remove SOME not all of the old gummy brake fluid. I did not properly bled the brakes. My rear brakes are locked solid. The Chiltons book shows one way of bleeding the brakes. However I keep hearing the book is wrong. I really need some advise. Thanks fellow riders.
 

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You don't usually need to bleed the brakes when fitting new pads, just push the pistons back. You might sometimes need to remove some fluid if the reservour at the master cylinder fills up as the pistons are pushed back.
Did you replace all the pads?
When you say the rear brakes are locked,
Do you mean the pedal wont go down?
Or, the rear wheel wont turn because the pads are tight on the disc?
 

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when changing pads, i like to take the calipers off the rotor (pads still in place) and then gently pump the lever / pedal until the pistons are most of the way out. go slowly and watch them, you don't want to pop the seals, then use a toothbrush to clean them. i find the s100 cleaner does a marvelous job at this.

sometimes crud builds up and keeps them from retracting into the bores. you should be able to push them back in with your fingers / thumbs.

it would be time well spent to do a proper bleed at this point. any gunk in the fluid can keep the fluid from flowing & pistons pushing against your pads, causing your brakes to drag.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
when changing pads, i like to take the calipers off the rotor (pads still in place) and then gently pump the lever / pedal until the pistons are most of the way out. go slowly and watch them, you don't want to pop the seals, then use a toothbrush to clean them. i find the s100 cleaner does a marvelous job at this.

sometimes crud builds up and keeps them from retracting into the bores. you should be able to push them back in with your fingers / thumbs.

it would be time well spent to do a proper bleed at this point. any gunk in the fluid can keep the fluid from flowing & pistons pushing against your pads, causing your brakes to drag.
when changing pads, i like to take the calipers off the rotor (pads still in place) and then gently pump the lever / pedal until the pistons are most of the way out. go slowly and watch them, you don't want to pop the seals, then use a toothbrush to clean them. i find the s100 cleaner does a marvelous job at this.

sometimes crud builds up and keeps them from retracting into the bores. you should be able to push them back in with your fingers / thumbs.

it would be time well spent to do a proper bleed at this point. any gunk in the fluid can keep the fluid from flowing & pistons pushing against your pads, causing your brakes to drag.
. I really F/U 'd . I opened the rear bled valve removing pressure so I could push pads in. I removed the rear brake pads to inspect them. THE NEXT DAY.....I forgot to put pads back in....I started bleeding procedures and saw the three calipers were pushing against the disc. I pushed them back in, Bled brakes . Rear pads are not withdrawing from disc. I NEED ADVISE !
 

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doesn't sound like you popped the seals, no fluid came out of the pistons, correct? pushing the pads back into the caliper shouldn't require opening a bleed valve.

how do the pistons look? did you clean the pistons while they were out? the pad spring? put a small dab of grease on the pad backing plate surfaces that contact the sliding points? can the caliper slide back and forth on it's pins?

are we talking drag or "can't even spin the wheel?

i don't think you messed up, i suspect some crud somewhere in the line (or the pistons / bores) is keeping fluid (& the pistons) from returning to the master cylinders.
 
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