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Submitted by: abtech

First of all, I use a technique that I learned several years ago from a gentleman who knew much more than I when it came to working on your bike ("Pops" Yoshimura). The technique described here works great on the 929 or any other bike that has the same overall swingarm length when measured from the center of the swingarm pivot bolt to the end of the swingarm.
To adjust the chain, you will need the following tools:

1 each 32 mm socket wrench
1 each Torque wrench
2 each 12 mm open end wrench
1 each small "T" edge
1 each Rear Stand


View attachment 31


Step 1

Put the bike up on the rear stand and clean the area around the rear axle and chain adjusters. Using the 32 mm socket wrench, loosen the rear axle nut until it is loose enough to move the axle in the swingarm slots by moving the rear wheel/tire.


Step 2

From the rear of the bike, grab the rear wheel and pull it back away from the engine. Sight down the chain to make certain the chain is approximately straight.
Using both 12 mm open end wrenches, loosen the chain adjuster lock nut (the one toward the front).


Step 3

On the chain (left) side of the bike, using one 12 mm open end wrench, turn the chain adjuster bolt (the one toward the rear) counter clockwise until the chain has approximately 1.75" of total slack when moved up and down below the swingarm. This is a rough measurement, as you now go to the other side and make the same approximate number of turns on the right side adjuster.
NOTE: When measuring chain slack, the idea is to measure the chain approximately mid way between the sprockets and measure the total distance when the chain is pushed toward the swingarm and pulled away from the swingarm. Use a link pin as a reference. When getting to your final adjustment, rotate the rear wheel and check the chain at it's loosest and tightest points, as the measured slack will change as the wheel is rotated.


Step 4
View attachment 33 View attachment 32

Recheck the chain slack and adjust both sides until the chain again has approximately 1.75" of total slack. Now with the "T" edge, measure the chain (left) side from the rear of the swingarm to the adjuster block and then do the same on the right side, adjusting it to match the reading from the left. Measure the chain slack again and adjust as needed until both sides are exactly the same and the chain has roughly 1.75" total slack measured midway below the swingarm.


Step 5

Take the bike off of the stand and have someone sit on the bike and measure the slack again at its tightest and loosest points. Adjust both sides as required, making certain that your final adjustment is identical on both sides when measured with the "T" edge and the chain has no more than 2.0" total slack and no less than 1.6" total slack. Tighten the chain adjuster lock nuts with a 12 mm open end wrench while holding the adjuster bolt with the other 12 mm wrench. Make certain you don't "readjust" the bolts while tightening.
Place the bike back on the stand and torque the rear axle nut to 83 Ft Lbs. (113 N-m).
 

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You guys rock for all the info in this forum!:D

I would just like to ask (as I got a reading of 105 Nm of torque on the rear axle bolt from my local dealer and I don't trust them THAT much anymore...)

What do you Birders say? Is 105 too little given the 113 prescribed in here?

Is there really that much difference between 105 and 113?

Your thoughts please.

Thanks and much appreciated as always!!:thumb::thumb:
 

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You realize you're responding to a thread that is over three years old.
 

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Ascar
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ah the old ones are the best ones. and there is no time limit on learning
 

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Absolutely!
 

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You realize you're responding to a thread that is over three years old.
Yeah, I know:D

But before I get accused of being too lazy to use the search function I thought I'd see what the search gave me.

Here's hoping that the torque required didn't change in the last three years either:thumb:
 

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Resident Eh?hole.
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My handy dandy service manual calls for 93 Nm for the axle nut. The only thing that approaches 105Nm is the steering stem nut at 103Nm.
 

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At least you didn't sell your Bird and buy a BSA.
 

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My handy dandy service manual calls for 93 Nm for the axle nut. The only thing that approaches 105Nm is the steering stem nut at 103Nm.
Sorry for responding now only but did download service manual off this site thanks to some very nice member who made it available.:thumb:

Torqued the rear wheel axle bolt to 93 Nm after straightening the rear wheel and now sweet.

Was nowhere near 93 Nm to start with and to think I pushed her past 200 km/h with a potentially loose rear axle bolt:eek:

Oh did I mention, this is how I got her back from a major 48K at the local dealer?:eek::rant::rant:
 

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How did something so simple get so complicated? The laser looks cool. Did anyone find that the marks on the swing are are off?

Besides, steps 1-4 have to be repeated in step 5. You have to measure with your dressed weight in the saddle or being so precise does not matter.

Step 2 is wrong. Don't pull the wheel back; push if forward. Pull it back and the chain side with stop first, the chain will be tight, and the wheel with be cocked.

If your chain gets tighter and looser as your rotate the tire, get a new chain or at least lube the hell out of it, ride and then re-test.

One important note: You always want to be pulling the rear back with the adjusters turning each one equally. Keep some amount of tightness on the axle bolt so it just slides but can't move around. Otherwise the adjuster may not be fully seated.

PS: If you get the chain too tight, back the adjusters off a few turns, push the wheel forward, get it even and come back again. You cannot just loosen the adjuster on a tight chain.
 

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$79 for a laser pointer no thanks you can get a laser pointer for less than $5.00
and achieve the same result

P.S. I'm ultra broke so anything above $ 10 is like what the [email protected]#$! sometimes I'm wondering how did I end up buying a bird

Form copy/past

I went to Home Depot and bought a laser level mounted on a compass base. I put it on a square of wood to level/straighten it and use the floor jack for height behind the sprocket. It shoots a straight line from rear to front sproket...Poor people have poor ways..

Motion Pro Chain Alignment Tool - KneeDraggers.com
 

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I know this is waaaay old, but on our weekend trip this past weekend more than half of the bikes staying at the home base had mis-adjusted chains. Just a couple of tips/clarifications...

1. Your dressed weight, or with luggage, etc. is unimportant. What is important is that the chain still ahve slack in it when the distance between the countershaft and the rear axle is at its greatest. This means either removing the shock (pita) so that you can freely move the swingarm through its stroke, or by getting a big person or peole to compress the rear while you measure. the former is more accurate, and the latter is way easier. the Chain must still have slack in it when the suspension is fully compressed in this manner...just sitting on it is not gonna do it.

This is how the OEM comes up with the numbers in the manual. You can trust those numbers btw, so ignore the previous paragraph if you just want to adjust the damn thing and aren't interested in screwing around.

2. "Slack" doesn't mean that it's possible to force the chain to deflect a few millimeters by pushing on it really hard. If you can't move the chain through a stroke of 1.25", you can consider that to be 0 slack. If, when you're setting the slack to a particular number that you've figured out, you must be able to _easily_ move the chain through this distance. If you're pulling it tight as a guitar string in order to get the number, it's too tight.

3. Err on the side of loose, not tight. Loose chain is happy chain.

4. Trick: many bikes (and my xx does this) can be annoying to adjust, because you get it set exactly where you want it, then you tighten the axle, and it's off (usually too tight). So, you loosen the axle, and repeat. Still wrong. Ugh. Here's the trick. Once you've got the tension where you want it, take a screwdriver (I usually use a wrench but only a screwdriver will fit past my chain guard on this bike) and stick it in between the top of the sprocket and the top run of the chain. Now rotate the wheel backwards until the screwdriver fully tensions the chain...pull it good and tight, and now wedge your foot under the tire to hold it in place. Now the axle is pulled tight up against the adjusters, and will stay exactly in that same spot as you tighten the axle. Once you tighten the axle, remove your foot, rotate the wheel forwards, remove the screwdriver, and revel in your perfectly adjusted chain tension.
 

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I was recently told by the Ducati mechanics at my local shop that you should always adjust the chain with weight on the bike as the chain tightens up when the rider sits on it
 

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This is how the OEM comes up with the numbers in the manual. You can trust those numbers btw, so ignore the previous paragraph if you just want to adjust the damn thing and aren't interested in screwing around.
Says it all for me.
 
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