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Discussion Starter #1
This is the third entry in the [Buying 'bird]-series.
Links to #1 and #2.

Having just acquired a Honda Blackbird (carbie), what am I up to, making the 'bird mine?
Read on.

You may disagree with choices made, but then again; it's a free world. Do your own thing. This, here, is for inspiration.

----------------------------
Step one: Making sure the bike remains mine.

The thing is, a '98 carbie isn't exactly hard to steal.

Watching youtube videos, I see factory-issued steering locks being overcome by thieves in less than 10 seconds. I read statements advocating not to use the steering lock, based on the fact that it's not effective in anything but ruining the bike's frame and advocating a multitude of alternative theft prevention methods in stead.

I'm worried. My new-to-me pride and joy seems to be almost free for the taking.
Oh no. You can have it, but only when prying it from my cold, dead hands... Figuratively speaking.

So I had a look-see to learn what people were doing to prevent theft.

Chains. D-locks U-locks. Disc-locks. Immobilisers. Fuses removed. What ingenuity...
But still, I have to make the scum decide to go for - well, anything but my 22-year old non-immobilised and basically defenseless hyperbike. Say, that MT-07 overthere, featuring only a basic ECU-based immobiliser and a steering lock. Possibly augmented by a chain lock + suitable post.

Tough job.

Well, for starters, let's be realistic. No lock is effective. All I can achieve is causing a slowdown. Meaning, If I want to 'win', I must achieve a slowdown that makes my 'bird unattractive seen from a timing POV. Compared to whatever time it takes to nick that nice, shiny MT-07 or <insert name of desirable bike>...

I can prolong the time it takes to bypass deterrent mechanisms.
I can shorten the time available to do the bypass.

Hmmmm...

Again, let's be realistic. A lock is better than no lock. Meaning I must address the issue of practicality, regarding locks. What lock is easily carried along and easily applied to the 'bird at standstill? Those locks that apply will be carried along and ultimately used, meaning they will do something to prevent theft. Which is better than nothing.

Did you realise that Honda already thought of this? They did. Part number 08M53-KAZ-800:
129049


I know - I read up on the 'standard carry-along-lock-solution-endorsed-by-Honda' on this forum. Rumour had it, a lock was indeed available, fitting the 'birds internal under-seat lock storage compartment.

So, I rode over to my local dealer and asked.
Bent (that's his name, it's not to hint he's crooked) did a few seconds of clickety-click on his computer-thing, then went out back and returned promptly with a Honda OE cardboard box:
129050


containing

129051


That goes into my luggage compartment like this:
129052


I even discovered it to match the seat itself:
129053


So this lock now accompanies me when out and about.

That would be a sensible first step, making sure this bird remains mine.

More to come.
 

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Honda also made a factory alarm that plugged in to the harness. It gave an audible alarm as well as an immobilizer I believe. Cbbear had one fitted to his 97 he parted out years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Honda also made a factory alarm that plugged in to the harness. It gave an audible alarm as well as an immobilizer I believe. Cbbear had one fitted to his 97 he parted out years ago.
Interesting.

Not yet having got a haynes manual; what harness are you referring to? The one I've heard about corrodes, and is exclusive to the FI model. Please elaborate, as this sounds like a simple solution. A solution that excludes, for obvious reasons, the fact that thugs + two skateboards = bike gone. Unless it's tied to a post with a big, ugly chain.
But still a solution.

I'm surprised how clever thugs can be.
 

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Can't really give the details unfortunately. Bear's was a factory setup and being a Honda tech new the part number. He's a member of the board. Give him a messsge.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm just reading along, chuckling.

Around here, being seen in public with one of those will get you arrested. Instantly.
Even carrying an object suitable for striking - eg a baseball bat - will get you in trouble.

I hope this explains my interest in locks and deterrents a little better.
 

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Understand completely storm. On the flip side the sight of it does more than enough by itself.
 

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This is the third entry in the [Buying 'bird]-series.
Links to #1 and #2.

Having just acquired a Honda Blackbird (carbie), what am I up to, making the 'bird mine?
Read on.

You may disagree with choices made, but then again; it's a free world. Do your own thing. This, here, is for inspiration.

----------------------------
Step one: Making sure the bike remains mine.

The thing is, a '98 carbie isn't exactly hard to steal.

Watching youtube videos, I see factory-issued steering locks being overcome by thieves in less than 10 seconds. I read statements advocating not to use the steering lock, based on the fact that it's not effective in anything but ruining the bike's frame and advocating a multitude of alternative theft prevention methods in stead.

I'm worried. My new-to-me pride and joy seems to be almost free for the taking.
Oh no. You can have it, but only when prying it from my cold, dead hands... Figuratively speaking.

So I had a look-see to learn what people were doing to prevent theft.

Chains. D-locks U-locks. Disc-locks. Immobilisers. Fuses removed. What ingenuity...
But still, I have to make the scum decide to go for - well, anything but my 22-year old non-immobilised and basically defenseless hyperbike. Say, that MT-07 overthere, featuring only a basic ECU-based immobiliser and a steering lock. Possibly augmented by a chain lock + suitable post.

Tough job.

Well, for starters, let's be realistic. No lock is effective. All I can achieve is causing a slowdown. Meaning, If I want to 'win', I must achieve a slowdown that makes my 'bird unattractive seen from a timing POV. Compared to whatever time it takes to nick that nice, shiny MT-07 or <insert name of desirable bike>...

I can prolong the time it takes to bypass deterrent mechanisms.
I can shorten the time available to do the bypass.

Hmmmm...

Again, let's be realistic. A lock is better than no lock. Meaning I must address the issue of practicality, regarding locks. What lock is easily carried along and easily applied to the 'bird at standstill? Those locks that apply will be carried along and ultimately used, meaning they will do something to prevent theft. Which is better than nothing.

Did you realise that Honda already thought of this? They did. Part number 08M53-KAZ-800:
View attachment 129049

I know - I read up on the 'standard carry-along-lock-solution-endorsed-by-Honda' on this forum. Rumour had it, a lock was indeed available, fitting the 'birds internal under-seat lock storage compartment.

So, I rode over to my local dealer and asked.
Bent (that's his name, it's not to hint he's crooked) did a few seconds of clickety-click on his computer-thing, then went out back and returned promptly with a Honda OE cardboard box:
View attachment 129050

containing

View attachment 129051

That goes into my luggage compartment like this:
View attachment 129052

I even discovered it to match the seat itself:
View attachment 129053

So this lock now accompanies me when out and about.

That would be a sensible first step, making sure this bird remains mine.

More to come.
used to have one just like that back in the 1990s , should be fine
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Moving on to installing my trusty satnav on the BB, I've looked on here and - obviously - found a neat way of doing this. @Metzi found that a 12mm allen-key would fit just nicely in the steering stem nut. And added his satnav to that key, then.
Ingenious! And simple.

Fiddling with doing this, I've come up with a similar solution, albeit I added a bit of 3D-print-trickery to my version to make it nice to work with. I use a Tomtom Rider 550 in case you're wondering.
Here goes:

<placeholder for picture of 3D-printed bit>

Parts.
129068

Assembled:
129069

129070

Stick the allen key into the hex:
129073

Plonk it down:
129074

Add the satnav:
129075


This is definitely not the final version. I've got ideas to solving a vital issue; that the satvav aligns to whatever position the stem nut hex ended up in - which rarely makes for 'horizontal'. Right now it looks like having been put in by an active alcoholic... And I want to make the mount smaller and lower and locked in place. As it is now, you can simply yank out the allen key.
  • Solve 'Horizontal adjustment' riddle.
  • Replace allen-key with screw-down-locking-mechanism.
  • Reduce mechanical footprint.
And then I'll have to get the powersupply sorted.

Enough for today.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Completely unrelated to the subject of settling in - and yet, utterly relevant, being all new to the 'bird.

Riding a Blackbird sure is fun. Says my inner cave-man.

Again, today, I went onto my local mway. The bird seems to be at home there.

And, yes, some smart-arse in his BMW X7 SUV just had to overtake me, as I was bumbling along at a leisurely pace.
So, I tagged along in the left lane - just to see what he had planned.

And the needle inched upwards, clockwise. Smart-arse leading the way.
I just tagged along...

Inevitably, the poor sod ran out of oomph.
Had to retreat to the right lane, allowing for traffic to overtake.

BMW X7 pricing:
129085

That's 215 thousand USD (or more) worth of teutonic luxury-SUV being run over by the 'bird. Just like that.

Somewhere, tonight, there's a rich guy regretting he brought a knife to a gunfight.


You a new owner? Beware; this bike is intoxicating. On an entirely primeval level. Arrrr...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Indeed my 750 euro black one could take out most high performance cars in the blink of an eye at a cost differential of 200 to 1
Which, being new to the BB, is what baffles me. Talk about cost-effectiveness...

I'm simply at a loss, not knowing what to do with all that excess power.
Indeed, Honda's nod to the SR-71 seems ever more appropriate. Effortless superiority. Untouchability.

Regarding SR-71, I assume y'all know this one? I had a chuckle, watching it all.
 

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With stock exhaust there was a reason they nicknamed it whispering death. It makes very little noise and you have discovered it is deceptively fast.
 

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This is the third entry in the [Buying 'bird]-series.
Links to #1 and #2.

Having just acquired a Honda Blackbird (carbie), what am I up to, making the 'bird mine?
Read on.

You may disagree with choices made, but then again; it's a free world. Do your own thing. This, here, is for inspiration.

----------------------------
Step one: Making sure the bike remains mine.

The thing is, a '98 carbie isn't exactly hard to steal.

Watching youtube videos, I see factory-issued steering locks being overcome by thieves in less than 10 seconds. I read statements advocating not to use the steering lock, based on the fact that it's not effective in anything but ruining the bike's frame and advocating a multitude of alternative theft prevention methods in stead.

I'm worried. My new-to-me pride and joy seems to be almost free for the taking.
Oh no. You can have it, but only when prying it from my cold, dead hands... Figuratively speaking.

So I had a look-see to learn what people were doing to prevent theft.

Chains. D-locks U-locks. Disc-locks. Immobilisers. Fuses removed. What ingenuity...
But still, I have to make the scum decide to go for - well, anything but my 22-year old non-immobilised and basically defenseless hyperbike. Say, that MT-07 overthere, featuring only a basic ECU-based immobiliser and a steering lock. Possibly augmented by a chain lock + suitable post.

Tough job.

Well, for starters, let's be realistic. No lock is effective. All I can achieve is causing a slowdown. Meaning, If I want to 'win', I must achieve a slowdown that makes my 'bird unattractive seen from a timing POV. Compared to whatever time it takes to nick that nice, shiny MT-07 or <insert name of desirable bike>...

I can prolong the time it takes to bypass deterrent mechanisms.
I can shorten the time available to do the bypass.

Hmmmm...

Again, let's be realistic. A lock is better than no lock. Meaning I must address the issue of practicality, regarding locks. What lock is easily carried along and easily applied to the 'bird at standstill? Those locks that apply will be carried along and ultimately used, meaning they will do something to prevent theft. Which is better than nothing.

Did you realise that Honda already thought of this? They did. Part number 08M53-KAZ-800:
View attachment 129049

I know - I read up on the 'standard carry-along-lock-solution-endorsed-by-Honda' on this forum. Rumour had it, a lock was indeed available, fitting the 'birds internal under-seat lock storage compartment.

So, I rode over to my local dealer and asked.
Bent (that's his name, it's not to hint he's crooked) did a few seconds of clickety-click on his computer-thing, then went out back and returned promptly with a Honda OE cardboard box:
View attachment 129050

containing

View attachment 129051

That goes into my luggage compartment like this:
View attachment 129052

I even discovered it to match the seat itself:
View attachment 129053

So this lock now accompanies me when out and about.

That would be a sensible first step, making sure this bird remains mine.

More to come.
Speaking from experience. Let me explain. I owned a 98 blackbird for six years. '01-'07. It was stolen three times. For some reason I got it back two times. One time they caught a guy stealing another bike and searched his property and found my bike, the second time the police pulled over two motorcycles drag racing on public streets and one of the bikes was mine. I asked the sheriff if he knew which one was winning, he laughed. No answer. Obviously the third time my bike was stolen I didn't get it back. Every time it was stolen it had a Kryptonite Lock on the rear sprocket and a chain through the front tire. If somebody wants to get it they're going to get it unless you have LoJack or some sort of GPS tracking security. Even then there's ways to disable it.

That being said where do you live that you are worried that somebody wants to steal a '98 blackbird? I know my'98 was hot s*** in 2001 in Myrtle Beach.
But damn!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Speaking from experience. Let me explain. <snip> Every time it was stolen it had a Kryptonite Lock on the rear sprocket and a chain through the front tire. If somebody wants to get it they're going to get it unless you have LoJack or some sort of GPS tracking security. Even then there's ways to disable it.

That being said where do you live that you are worried that somebody wants to steal a '98 blackbird? I know my'98 was hot s*** in 2001 in Myrtle Beach.
But damn!
I know there's no absolutely sure way of preventing theft. If they want it badly enough, they'll take it.
That said, I'm lucky enough to live in a reasonably OK place (midlevel income suburban Denmark), where neighbours look out for each other. It's in a shed, out of sight.
Still; this house here is the only house within a hundred-yard radius that hasn't been burgled at some time. Just doing nothing seems to be not-so-smart.

Also; when out and about, I'd like to be reasonably sure the bike is still there when I return from visiting a POI. Touring Europe puts you in unknown, sometimes shady places from time to time. I like to travel using airbnb rather than hotels, and several times my bike (until now, the CB500) has had to spend the night in full public.

I can imagine that parking my new-to-me bird next to other 2018-on, shiny bikes (Yamahas, Ducatis, Kwaks and the odd Harley) should render it the lesser desirable choice. Yes.
But in - say - rural Romania, the vehicles parked next to the bird will likely be a horse cart and an old Dacia. Then, which vehicle is the object of desire...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yesterday, the Haynes manual arrived in the mail. I know there's a workshop manual on here - and I've downloaded it already - but getting the Haynes for a vehicle i buy has become routine to me. Also, there's nothing like a proper paper book! Thank you JAWS :)
I'm now reading up on the fairing handling issue (a hitherto unknown process). While waiting for the bits and bobs going into satnav-mount v2, I'm figuring out how to get at the electrics, so that I can borrow some for powering farkles. The satnav of course, but also a USB-outlet and perhaps a laptop charger. And that'll probably require parts of the cowling to come off.
 
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