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Discussion Starter #1
I have an interesting one.

I have a 98 Blackbird that recently starting draining the battery even when just sitting still and turned off. I bought a new battery installed it and in about 24hours it takes about five hours on the tricklecharger to get it back to full. is this normal? and where should I start looking if it isn't.
 

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Assuming your bike charging system is ok, do you have an alarm or any electrical accessories that may be draining the battery? Easy way to test for this: Key off, remove either + or - connection from battery post and bridge the gap with a small spare (incandescent) bulb and see if it lights up and how bright.
Also, your new battery may be a dud.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah but if it drains that much of the battery in about 24 hours it'll run the battery dead completely in a few days, won't it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Assuming your bike charging system is ok, do you have an alarm or any electrical accessories that may be draining the battery? Easy way to test for this: Key off, remove either + or - connection from battery post and bridge the gap with a small spare (incandescent) bulb and see if it lights up and how bright.
Also, your new battery may be a dud.
it used to have an alarm system but I removed it when I bought the bike and it ran fine for quite a while until last fall when it killed the battery I had in it. other then the built in clock there should be no other drains. I will definitely try that trick. "one I hadn't thought to do"
 

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I can't tell from the text that the new battery is also draining. It says that charging took 5 hours. Or am I reading it wrong?

But when I read it the way I think it is now, I suspect your voltage regulator is broken. There's a short circuit in there, I suppose

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You can also put a meter in series to check current leakage. Key off meter set to amps disconnect the negative battery terminal . Connect the meter + to the negative battery cable. Then connect the - lead to the battery negative terminal and read the meter value. If it's above .2 mA or so, start pulling fuses and see which makes it drop. Then chase out that circuit.
 

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You can also put a meter in series to check current leakage. Key off meter set to amps disconnect the negative battery terminal . Connect the meter + to the negative battery cable. Then connect the - lead to the battery negative terminal and read the meter value. If it's above .2 mA or so, start pulling fuses and see which makes it drop. Then chase out that circuit.
I've had current leakage a couple of times on Daily Bird so I do this test on a regular basis (like the check of the charging system).

One thing I would add, always start testing with the Amps high (like 10 Amps) and then work down ............ yes I have had to search for a meter fuse on a Sunday. :rolleyes:
 

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Caveat to the above start at the max amp setting first. Typically 20 amps then as duck says dial it down 1 step at a time and wait.
 

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But if the process that TheDuck or Beestoy explained doesn't work then connect the battery put your meter on volts. Connect the leads to the battery and the put the meter somewhere where you can see it while riding. If you are riding and rpms are 3500 or above and you aren't showing 14.2 volts on your meter then your charging system is most likely weak. A passenger could hold it. It can be done in the drive not in gear too. I feel better with a real world test though!

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you all for this excellent information. as soon as MD weather permits IE Warms up and stops raining, Grrr. I'll try these and get back to you all.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry it took so long to get back to ya'll. I've got good news. twas just a really bad battery. and well a Newb motorcycle mechanic that brain farts when it comes to electrical problems. Thank you all for the good advice. It will be stuff I'll get to use in the future. Now just can't wait til the season starts so I can take "Beauty" for a ride.
 

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Jorgy, with the new battery installed, I recommend that you check the running voltage with a multimeter before taking any long rides. Check readings at idle and at 4-5000 rpm. It is possible that a bad charging system killed the battery.. The only reason I say this is because this is a common fault.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Jorgy, with the new battery installed, I recommend that you check the running voltage with a multimeter before taking any long rides. Check readings at idle and at 4-5000 rpm. It is possible that a bad charging system killed the battery.. The only reason I say this is because this is a common fault.
Good point. I will definitely do that.
 

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Make sure the battery has a full charge and then check idle and 5k numbers as fizz suggests. They should be at the same numbers as above.
 
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