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Hey guys! I've heard the term "adventure bike" being used a lot, I was wondering what it actually means. Like what does it take for a bike to be taken as an "adventure bike"?
 

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Resident Eh?hole.
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Dual purpose, usually. Like the BMW GS, V-Strom, etc. Something that can run off-road almost as well as on.
 

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Super Red Devil
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From Dual-sport motorcycle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A few models are described as "adventure bikes".... these models can be described as dual-sports, which are street-legal motorcycles that can be operated on pavement, dirt roads and trails.

Terms such as dual-sport, enduro and adventure bike are marketing descriptions, not strict definitions of weight, power, and intended usage.

Heavyweight dual-sports weigh over 350 lb (160 kg). They are designed primarily for riders who want to travel long distances on pavement with occasional forays onto dirt roads. They usually come with smoother tires that perform better on pavement. These motorcycles are also called adventure bikes by some manufacturers.

When dual-sports are fitted for long distance travel with accessories such as oversized gas tanks, luggage, and other distance-oriented gear, they are often referred to as "adventure bikes"
 

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200 miles on the M6 motorway (UK) in rush-hour, in torrential rain, on a Blackbird......awesome 'Adventure' bike :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
From Dual-sport motorcycle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A few models are described as "adventure bikes".... these models can be described as dual-sports, which are street-legal motorcycles that can be operated on pavement, dirt roads and trails.

Terms such as dual-sport, enduro and adventure bike are marketing descriptions, not strict definitions of weight, power, and intended usage.

Heavyweight dual-sports weigh over 350 lb (160 kg). They are designed primarily for riders who want to travel long distances on pavement with occasional forays onto dirt roads. They usually come with smoother tires that perform better on pavement. These motorcycles are also called adventure bikes by some manufacturers.

When dual-sports are fitted for long distance travel with accessories such as oversized gas tanks, luggage, and other distance-oriented gear, they are often referred to as "adventure bikes"

Thanks for the detailed post! Well your opinion builds on what people have mostly said on the thread - there is no hard and fast rule about what basically is an "adventure bike" and its mostly a marketing term. I guess they use this term because it makes their bike sound more cool and strong and able to take on rough terrain. To make it more appealing to a younger market.
 

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the ultimate adventure bike - BMW R1200GS
Big, slow, pig ugly but boy, what a machine. You will be amazed what this thing can do - on and off road. I've left many a blackbird or superbike trailing behind on a twisty road, that's with topbox and panniers
 

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I've left many a blackbird or superbike trailing behind on a twisty road, that's with topbox and panniers
Really ! My GSA always wanted to run wide on twisties that the Blackbird tracks through with ease.......thinking about it maybe it was a confidence thing, you get a lot less 'feel' from the front of a GSA, perhaps I just didn't trust it enough :idunno: Awesome bike non the less, loved the road presence.
 

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Yup, that telelever has very little feel but the front end grip is pretty impressive. Just ask the guy on the S1000RR who couldn't shake me round the track. you can lean the GS so far that footpegs scrape with no worries.
 

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the ultimate adventure bike - BMW R1200GS
Big, slow, pig ugly but boy, what a machine. You will be amazed what this thing can do - on and off road. I've left many a blackbird or superbike trailing behind on a twisty road, that's with topbox and panniers
For sure its got many capabilities....but i won't bet that on a tight mountain path with plenty of rocks...too much weight and mass..there are test pics and unverified rumours of a GS using an upcoming liquid cooled engine...
 

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Super Red Devil
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the problem I always had with those "dual-mode" bikes is that yes, they are adventurous enough that you can drive anywhere with them (street/off-road), but don't do either one really good... I guess that's the price we have to pay for commodity.
 

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For sure its got many capabilities....but i won't bet that on a tight mountain path with plenty of rocks...too much weight and mass..there are test pics and unverified rumours of a GS using an upcoming liquid cooled engine...
True, but that's not it's purpose.
I've also heard they looking at the liquid cooled engine - friggin' emissions crap. Interestingly, to make the current GS pass the Euro 3 requirements, the bike was made to run very lean (BMW will deny this of course). In Europe, at relatively short trips at moderate throttle, this is ok. Here, we have long distances and riders who tend to load the bikes and ride for long periods with the throttle pretty much to the stop :eyebrows: The lean running meant valves giving up prematurely. Easily solved with an in line resistor to enrichen the mixture a bit. Emissions? Hmmm.

the problem I always had with those "dual-mode" bikes is that yes, they are adventurous enough that you can drive anywhere with them (street/off-road), but don't do either one really good... I guess that's the price we have to pay for commodity.
I would beg to differ. I ride my GS pretty much every day to work and back. Been on the road, off road, on track and this bike continually amazes me. Sure, she's not pretty and is slow (216 km/h max speed on the GPS when she hits rev limiter in sixth) but must be the best all round bike IMHO. In December I rode over 1000km (600 miles +) in one day through blinding rain with no hassles. Arrived pretty relaxed. On the same trip we did 9 passes in one day with a big group of bikes - poor superbikes (except for one well ridden R1) got left way behind in the twisty bits (toasted me on the straights though).
Off road can get challenging as the bike is heavy but it is surprisingly capable in the right hands.
Last weekend I was in Sabie, which has roads seemingly designed for blackbirds (and superbikes). My mate was behind me on a KTM 990 filming me on the bird, so I wasn't trying to shake him, but I was amazed at how easily he stayed with me.
 
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